Sport for Change and Social Good

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Sport for Change and Social Good Workshops 

 

How you can change people’s lives through sport and physical activity
in a vibrant, visible and viable way

 

A series of workshops for professionals and volunteers held across the UK

 

Providing thoughts, tools and to-dos in an inspiring and effective way

 

Sport for Change and Social Good Workshops will run from 9.30 am – 4.00 pm

21st November 2018
University of Stirling
Stirling

22nd November 2018
Sheffield Institute of Sport
Sheffield

27th November 2018
University of South Wales, Treforest Campus
Cardiff

28th November 2018
Trailfinders Sports Club, Ealing
London

30th November 2018
Deal Cultural Centre, Ladywood
Birmingham

From sport for sport’s sake to sport for change and social good – how?

Sport and physical activity have an incredible power to create social change and across the UK there is an increasing focus on how sport and physical activity can deliver social good in their communities and help people change their lives through sport and physical activity. And many organisations of all shapes and sizes are already delivering great work in this field, having a major impact on their communities.

However, there is also uncertainty across many sports and physical activity organisations as for how best to start on the journey of changing communities and lives through sport.

This is no longer about a debate ‘sport for sport’s sake vs. ‘sport for change/social good but about how sports and physical activity providers can attract more people by working closely with community bodies such as Housing, patient associations, faith centres, Police and education (at all levels) and become a hub for their communities.
By doing so you will also be able to attract new skilled and passionate volunteers and funding from non-sports funders because of your social impact.
So by dealing with inequality in sports participation, helping to create community cohesion, playing a role in reducing crime and anti-social behaviour, helping to improve education and employability, and health and wellbeing sport and physical activity providers can grow their numbers, reach and impact.

There are already a number of exciting initiatives taking place across the UK developed and delivered by enterprising organisations from across a number of sectors both within sport and physical activity and beyond and Sports Marketing Network are indeed working with some of them.

We have developed all our material based on best practice and you can now learn from the best.

This workshop will help you to become a Community Sports Change Maker

Over the last 10-11 years, SMN has developed a vast expertise and experience working with a number of amazing community sports entrepreneurs who have developed vibrant, visible and viable hubs for their communities. We have seen what works whether they are based in rural Scotland such as Galloway Cricket Club) or inner-city Leeds, such as Hunslet Club and we have developed a massive library of best-practice studies and built a great toolbox of action plans and templates.
So, we will be sharing all this with you on these five interactive and engaging workshops.

By attending the Sport for Change and Social Good workshop you will learn to develop

  • a sport for change and social approach – understanding what works, how to achieve change, clarity of purpose around connections to the outcomes you want to achieve, learning from others
  • a team of committed, passionate and inspirational staff (and volunteers)
  • an understanding of community and individual needs
  • an inclusive approach
  • a community development approach
  • an ability to work jointly with others
  • consistency and sustainability of approach
  • a clear intention to bring about change through sport and physical activity
  • a clear strategy and action plan for accessing funding
  • links with key priority areas such as community cohesion, playing a role in reducing crime and anti-social behaviour, helping to improve education and employability, and health and wellbeing and other
  • a sustainable organisation – building capacity, working with staff and volunteers, finances
  • an organisational structure – to ensure that quality of delivery is high and aligned to the desired outcomes
  • evidence – how to align with outcomes and report against these effectively, providing guidance and tools for different settings, how to measure outcomes and not just outputs

All this will be provided in an engaging and interactive way, using jargon-free language and case-studies from sports and community organisations of all shapes and sizes.

Who should attend this workshop: This workshop is aimed at people who are involved with sports and physical activity organisations interested in developing sport for change and social good initiatives such as governing bodies of sports, Community Sports Hubs, Country Sports Partnerships, community sports trusts, sports clubs, leisure trusts, funding bodes, school sports partnerships and activators

People who are involved with community organisations interested in using sport and physical to engage with people and communities such as housing associations, Police, social enterprises, health and patient organisations, Local Authorities, voluntary organisations, funding bodies, NHS and Public Health,

The presenter:
Svend Elkjaer, the presenter is one the UK’s leading advocates for and expert in the role that sport and physical activity can play in bringing about positive change for individuals and communities.
He has probably more experience than anybody else in developing and delivering innovative and effective services and support for sports clubs and community sports enterprises helping them to change lives and communities.

Having worked closely with a number of major community organisations and sports bodies across the UK and Denmark we also appreciate that there are significant cultural differences from sport to sport, from community to community and indeed from club to club. So we are able and agile to make a real difference.

More than 4,000 sports providers have benefitted from SMN’s services attending our workshops and presentations, being mentored or receiving consultancy. SMN has also advised, consulted and trained a number of organisations and public bodies including the RFU, FA, Cricket Scotland, Amateur Swimming Association, British Gymnastics, Sport Wales, England Golf, England Athletics, sportscotland, etc. and 50+ local authorities from London, via Merthyr Tydfil to Dundee and Copenhagen.

Interested in learning more about this exciting programme and how we can help your club(s) to become Community Sports Change Makers and run vibrant, visible and viable sports facilities and clubs, then get in touch.
Get in touch on +44 1423 326 660 or email svend@smnuk.com

Introducing: the Community Sports Change Maker

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Help our sports club make a real change
We must help our community sports clubs play a bigger role in their communities

Introducing:
the Community Sports Change Maker

Many traditional community sports clubs are struggling to attract players and volunteers and to generate the income required to provide a really great experience at their club.

Certainly, in many of our team sports such as football, rugby league and union and cricket many clubs are experiencing dwindling numbers. (We understand that the number of clubs entered into the National Village Cricket Cup has gone from 700 to 300 in a few years).
At the same time, we are seeing and are indeed working with, a number of community sports clubs across the UK who are growing, generating income, attracting volunteers and developing new partnerships. So what is the difference? What are these clubs doing to make this happen?

Simple answer: They are more than just sports clubs – they are a hub for their communities.

They play a part in people’s lives, they involve the whole family and community, they can be based in rural Scotland such as Galloway Cricket Club or inner city Leeds, such as Hunslet Club but they are all making a real change in the community around them. And that’s is why they are growing. They do not see sporting success as the be all and end all; if it happens fine, if not, fine anyway.

These clubs, we call them Community Sports Enterprises, have often been doing their great work in isolation with little support or inspiration. Many of them have attended one of our Grow Your Club workshops and some have spoken at our events or featured in our newsletters and on our website. But, they need a higher profile and more inspiration.
Some visionary governing bodies and other sports organisations have brought us in to help these thriving enterprises to grow and it’s been great to see the impact that has made (see below).

#MoreThan – the way forward

It is no coincidence that the club enterprise programme SMN are delivering for Cricket Scotland is called #MoreThanCricket, that the similar programme we are delivering for the Football Association of Wales Trust is called #MoreThanAClub and that the programme we delivered for England Golf was called #MoreThanGolf

I am sure you get my point.

Across the UK there is, at Government level, increasing focus on how sport can be a catalyst for change and social good. This is we are seeing programmes like Changing Lives through Sport and Physical Activity in Scotland and Healthy and Active Fund in Wales where clubs and community organisations are required to collaborate to deliver real benefits to their communities in order to access the funding.
(And I can guarantee you those clubs that get involved with these projects are the thriving ones, win/win).
Our community sports clubs can become Community Sports Change Makers which is an enterprise which changes people’s lives through sport, in a vibrant, visible and viable way.

The model illustrates how community sports clubs, by having the right vision and by being run as a vibrant, visible and viable enterprise they can also deliver real benefits in their communities These go hand in hand: “You can’t make changes to people’s lives if you are not a sustainable enterprise, because you won’t be around for long”.

So, if your club is a well-run enterprise you can be involved in improving health and wellbeing, reduce crime and anti-social behaviour, create community cohesion and improve people’s health and well-being, to name a few.

You will also be able to develop partnerships with a wide range of community organisations which will bring new players, volunteers and income streams to your club.

An example is the number of cases where we are experiencing productive partnerships between community sports clubs and Housing Associations. The latter want happy, healthy tenants and that is something that welcoming and engaging sports club can deliver.

So, if you are ‘just sport’ I wish you the best of luck (because you will need it), but you are ‘more than sport’, well done.

Yes, these are challenging and exciting times for community sports clubs,

SMN will soon be launching a series of workshops and guides on How to become a Community Sports Change Maker. If you want to learn more about we can help your organisation or club, please do get in touch.

New places and new people – a different approach to engaging with inactive people

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New places and new people – a different approach to engaging with inactive people

London Sport may have found an answer to the question of how to get more inactive people active

(hint: it may not necessarily involve sports clubs, leisure centres or sports coaches)

Over the years we have seen study after study, read report after report and listened to many conference presentations, all talking about how to get physically inactive people more active.

And, it has to be said, whatever figures you see, that we haven’t really seen massive increases in the number of inactive people taking up sport and physical activity. We do have plenty of people involved with sports coaching and sports development praising the wonders of being active, but in many cases, they talk to themselves and not to the inactive and the people and places they connect with. So, what to do? How do we engage with the inactive people and get them active?

For a while, London Sport, the County Sports Partnership for London, has been studying and considering how to develop a broader and better workforce for getting people active. A couple of weeks ago they published a framework for realising the ambition of London becoming the most physically active in the world and you see the document here.

The challenge of the traditional workforce

The research reveals that 48% of inactive Londoners don’t feel that the traditional workforce (sports clubs, leisure centres and sports coaches), meet their current needs.

At the same time, 38% of people within the traditional workforce in London see working with inactive people as their role (which means that almost two-thirds of sports coaches and clubs in London do not see working with inactive people as their role). Please read that again – yes, so, a large majority of people involved with sport and physical only want to engage with people who already active.
No wonder then that 78% of the traditional workforce doesn’t feel confident that their approach works effectively with inactive people.

So if a cricketer wants to improve his reverse sweep or a gymnast wants to develop her somersault then the traditional coaches at our community sports clubs or leisure centres are more than happy to work with them. But for the inactive person, perhaps with less talent, the situation is more bleak – sop where and to whom do they go get motivated to become active? Answers on a postcard, please.

So, despite all our coach education, club development initiatives and legacy programmes from London 2012 and Glasgow 2014 there is a considerable gap between the traditional sports delivery system and people who simply do not feel that the current places and people where they want to join. (Yes, this research only covers London, but in our experience, these figures represent a fairly universal picture).

Yes, as London Sport points out, we need a better workforce, which can provide a better experience catering to the diverse needs of the inactive part of the population and a broader workforce which involves non-sport organisations from housing to faith centres.
Inactive people want to enjoy themselves, have fun, improve their skills and be part of a welcoming social and sporting experience. Yes, if possible, they want to develop their skills, but they want to do so in an engaging way; they don’t want to be put under undue pressure from an over-ambitious and zealous coach. Also, they want to be active in an environment which they know and where they feel comfortable and at home, which is probably not a leisure centre or sports club full of fit people in leotards!

So, we need to distinguish between ‘sports coaches/fitness instructors’ and the ‘activators/hosts’ who get inactive people into regular activity: We call them Activity Growers.

An Activity Grower is a person who removes the barriers inactive people experience when wanting to become more active and then focus on keeping them motivated, engaged and active.

  1. They engage with local communities and link up with inactive people based on their age, health condition, ethnicity, demographics, and/or location
  2. They are welcoming people in all shapes and sizes
  3. They provide experiences which all types of participants can enjoy
  4. They tell their story through photos, videos and hashtags. From flyers to Instagram – efficient and effective communication
  5. They develop the enterprise culture and skills which can help ensure long-term sustainability
Here based on our work with hundreds and hundreds of all types of providers are some suggestions on how to keep people active from cradle to care-home. • Understand people life stages and adapt your customer offering, experience and communication to each of them. From child to teenager, from boy/girl about town to young parent, and so on. From All-Star cricket for 5-8-year – olds to walking football/basketball to the older generation and everything in between • We are all different and want to be listened to and treated as individuals • We all want to have fun. But, what fun for the coach is rarely what is fun for the average 14-year old. To keep people stay within sport they will have to love it, otherwise, they will lose heart and leave. Get them involved, put a smile on their faces and help them to progress at their pace. Remember that love does change over the years so you will have to change with it.

So, there seems to be a great scope for developing much more innovative solutions for engaging with the ‘hard-to-reach’ communities. Golf in mosques and care-homes, cricket on beaches or football on housing estates, the list goes on…
Remember, this is about getting people active and not about winning medals (having said that, Moen Alli, the England cricketer started playing with a taped tennis ball in a car park…)

Yes, London Sport is absolutely right. If we are to attract and retain more people in sport and physical activity we need to recruit and develop a much broader workforce based in our communities.

Here a Sports Marketing Network we would be delighted to be involved with delivering that.

Time to change our volunteer awards in community sport

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Time to change our volunteer awards in community sport

 

By Ian Sandbrook, Founder/Owner,
Sport for Good Consulting,
former Head of Participation, Cricket Scotland

I love volunteering. I champion it at every chance and believe wholeheartedly in the benefits of it, both for the sport, and the individual. Volunteers truly are the lifeblood of our sport. However, this is where I’m a bit controversial. We need to change our traditional way of recognising volunteers – the good old ‘Volunteer Awards’.

Sport for Good consulting exists to inspire, connect and support sport providers to become community sport enterprises: community-focussed, socially aware and customer-led.

They with sports associations and clubs to help make them relevant to their communities.

Based in New Zealand they cover both New Zealand and Australia

Don’t get me wrong, recognising the huge efforts of volunteers is crucial and awards functions are fantastic ways to celebrate the many outstanding contributions people make. I just think the award categories are unimaginative and even slightly counter-productive to encouraging new volunteers. Let me explain.

I used to run Volunteer Awards for many years in a previous job. They were well intentioned and we made the best efforts we could to recognise key volunteers. We had awards and categories like volunteer of the month, volunteer of the year, life-time service, coach of the year, official of the year etc. These are all very worthy categories and the people that were recognised no doubt appreciated it.

However, what I noticed after a number of years were some interesting trends:

• Many of the same volunteers were nominated each year
• Many of those nominated had given long-term service
• Often clubs were overly reliant on these individuals
• Generally, we always had to twist arms and chase clubs up to get them to nominate people

When I reflected on this, I just wasn’t comfortable with what we were doing. Not only was it not capturing the hearts and minds of the clubs we were trying to motivate, it wasn’t actually aligned to the club development approach I wanted to take. We were just doing it to tick a box and because it was the right thing to do.
Inadvertently, our awards were really set up to recognise the great club stalwart that had basically given their life to the club. Subliminally, we were sending out the message that to get the recognition you had to give up your life or simply be the best coach or official. How was that helping us encourage new volunteers in this day and age? Most people don’t have the time or the desire to do that but that shouldn’t mean their contribution is less worthy. We needed to celebrate the many small contributions that make a difference, as a way of encouraging a more healthy club environment and realistic approach to volunteering. Essentially, we wanted to encourage ‘bite-sized volunteering’.
Again, please don’t take this the wrong way. Those stalwarts are hugely important, still deserve to be recognised, and this isn’t meant to demean their outstanding contributions. I just believe it shouldn’t be the overall thrust of our approach if our priority is to try and attract more, and new, people to get involved.
In my opinion, the award categories we put in place should reflect the behaviours we want our clubs to demonstrate. Isn’t that the big picture reason for running volunteer awards?

So what are the behaviours we want clubs to embrace that will ultimately help them improve? How about how welcoming they are, how well they engage with their communities, ways they’ve generated new income, how they’ve engaged new people at the club etc.

Therefore, I made the decision with the support of a great mentor, Svend Elkjaer from Sports Marketing Network, to fundamentally change our awards from ‘Volunteer Awards’ to ‘Club Awards’, with the following categories:

• ‘Volunteer Awards to ‘Club Awards’
• Most Welcoming Club
• Best Use of Bite-sized Volunteers at a Club
• Most Innovative Income Generation at a Club
• Strongest Community Engagement by a Club
• Best Use of Social Media at a Club
• Biggest Change-Maker at a Club

These categories aligned with our club development approach, and crucially, to the behaviours we wanted clubs to start to demonstrate.

All the categories are still driven by volunteers but the focus was taken away from the individual and more focussed on the ‘team’ effort in improving aspects of the club.

The results were interesting. We had record numbers of nominations, we had new people and groups of people volunteering and being nominated, and we had clubs doing things they had never even thought of doing before. It challenged the clubs’ thinking, exactly what we were trying to achieve.

So let’s be a bit more thoughtful about our volunteer recognition.

Make people feel special and valued but have some method behind it.

Thriving Clubs programme is helping cricket clubs in Scotland to become more vibrant, visible and viable
This new award programme formed part of the Thriving Clubs programme that Ian Sandbrook launched when he was Head of Participation at Cricket Scotland, working with SMN.

The programme includes:

• staff development, training by SMN
• SMN mentor support to the most aspiring clubs
• Staff mentor to other clubs

• Grow Your ClubClub Workshops
• Webinars
• ‘How to’ Guides
• Best practice e-newsletters
• Club Awards
• #MoreThanCricket club conference

SMN are currently delivering a similar two-year programme for Football Association of Wales Trust and their 450-odd junior clubs and we are about to announce other clib enterprise programmes for sports bodies and leagues.

Sweating the asset – introducing facility enterprise for community sports clubs

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Sweating the asset – introducing facility enterprise for community sports clubs
A new service for community sports clubs that are keen to develop their facility, their community impact and their income generation.

Workshops, guides, webinars and consultancy

 

Across the UK there are 1000s of clubhouses at our community sports clubs which are bases for 100.000s of people enjoying their favourite sports and, in many cases, they are also places for social and community activities.

Some are in a brilliant state, well-maintained and generating income to help for the upkeep of the facility and the running of the clubs. However, there are, unfortunately. also, too many clubhouses, which are in a bad state of repair, being left to the elements and not a place where no one, apart from the club diehards, wants to spend any time. As a result, the club is not able to use the clubhouse as a base to build the necessary community engagement and generate the income required to become a viable place.

Over the years, Sports Marketing Network has worked with probably more community sports facilities than most other people and we have seen some fantastic places, where the clubs are able to maintain and develop their facilities through good management and enterprise.

Tynemouth Cricket Club – from struggling club to dynamic cricket enterprise

At Tynemouth Cricket Club the clubhouse is the base for a really enterprising clubs that play a tremendous role in its community, but it was not always so.

In 2005 the club had a falling membership, run down facilities and although they had a history of producing good juniors they were struggling to get teams out.

Before: From: A clubhouse with a hole in the roof  

They started a community programme in local schools which saw the saw junior numbers increase.

They also decided to do something about the clubhouse and launched a buy a brick appeal. The money came flooding in and they reached their target with time to spare.

Other organisations supported the project, such as the local fire station which donated the entire commercial kitchen.
Nat West Cricket Force saw enough tiles donated to tile kitchen, shower/toilet area and bar area.
Season 2006 saw the start of their work with Chance to Shine, as one of the first clubs to get involved in this fantastic initiative.
ECB also selected them as a club for a series of Sky TV test match lunchtime programmes called Clublife. Six programmes followed various aspects of the club’s work and this led to an enormous interest in the club from all parts.
The rewards of all this publicity cannot be overstated as all of a sudden it opened doors and gave the club credibility with organisations, people and most important, funders.
They decided to employ a part-time club development officer to undertake their school visits and coordinate the club junior programme.
Initially, they worked with six schools in primary and middle ages. This saw a large influx of new juniors and with that volunteers from the ranks of parents who came to enjoy our new clubhouse.
This “good news” story building on our already growing reputation led to further successful grant applications and bar take/subscriptions.

After: A happy, thriving community hub  

The club’s annual turnover has gone from £43k to £164k.

As many had come into the club in June/July they were able to run holiday camps. These included young leader training, where older juniors helped out, learnt IT skills, running a club shop as well as coaching skills.
They received children from backgrounds cricket previously hadn’t really reached and the Youth Justice Board Awarded £5000 to extend the programme to other schools.
Income soured, volunteers soured – the place thrived as a centre of our community
In 2010 their reputation had grown to the extent we were commissioned by the Local Authority to deliver in as many schools as they could across the year.

As their volunteer base grew and people became engaged with the club they raised funds for pet projects – allowing them ownership!
Out of season fundraising became significant – it started with a small group of parents pooling fireworks and having a party. 24 years later they fireworks attract 9000 people and generate £24,000 profit.

All kinds of agencies help due to their standing in the community and the Beer Festival the club works with CAMRA and local Rugby club and share proceeds and donate to a local charity each year.

They have also developed partnerships with other organisations to commercialise their ground maintenance and ensure regular cash flow throughout the year and allowing them to retain full-time groundsman.

And they developed a massive community network

Strong connections across the community

If Tynemouth CC had stayed as ‘just a cricket club’ they would have had no chance of raising the funds required and to generate the income to make the facility financially sustainable.

They are also a real hub for their local community and #MoreThanAClub, which makes them much more relevant, way beyond sport.

We call this ‘facility enterprise’ or ‘from sports club to community hub’. This thinking then influences
• the way the clubhouse is designed around community needs (while still accommodating sport)
• the way it is funded (community grants/social investments/ low-interest loans)
• the way the enterprise funds its activities through events, sporting and otherwise.

Creating Community Sports Change Makers

Introducing Community Sports Change Makers:
An enterprise which changes people’s lives through sport, in a vibrant, visible and viable way

The model helps community sports organisations to understand how by having the right vision and by improving on all their eight strands as a Community Sports Enterprise, they can also deliver on five change areas. These go hand in hand: “You can’t be do good if you are not an enterprise, because you won’t be around for long”.

So, how do we develop welcoming clubhouses and community facilities which are designed to be community hubs, and build cultures and skills which enable the club to become a viable community sports enterprise? In short use our facilities as bases for creating Community Sports Change Maker

Sweating the asset – introducing facility enterprise for community sports clubs

This programme will help community sports facilities and their clubs to develop the capability and capacity to be great facility managers, community developers and income generators.

Workshops, Webinars, Guides, Consultancy/Mentoring

Obviously, this requires a different approach to the one where ‘winning the league ‘ means everything, but the ironic thing I have seen many cases where the ‘community sports enterprises’ also improve their sporting prowess while changing lives and communities.

What we cover:
• Developing and agreeing with your club’s vision
• Getting the whole club behind you
• Reviewing the situation internally and externally
• Funding your development/build
• Getting the legal structure right
• Facility management – how are you going to manage the facility
• How to best assess your potential for working with community partners – what are your assets, relationships and skills?
• Developing sporting and non-sporting events
• Introduce innovative ways of engaging with your customers and your community
• Learn how to run your club effectively and efficiently
• Develop new ways of working in order to generate new income streams
• How to manage a vibrant community sports club by developing your culture and skills
• Attract and retain skilled and passionate volunteers

Interested in learning more about this exciting programme and how we can help your club(s) to become Community Sports Change Makers and run vibrant, visible and viable sports facilities and clubs, then get in touch.

Six Grow Your Football Club workshops across Wales

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More Than A Club – enterprising football clubs programme in Wales is launched

Six Grow Your Football Club workshops across Wales

The Football Association of Wales announces their exciting new More Than A Club programme, developed to help our community football clubs become more enterprising and sustainable, kicks-off with a range of workshops, across Wales.
This two-year support programme will help our grassroots football clubs to become proficient in creating great experiences for the players, parents and volunteers involved.
Each of Wales’ six Area Football Associations will host a More Than A Club workshop in September and October 2018.

 

For the full programme and to book a place

 
 
The comprehensive programme includes

· Staff development programme
· SMN mentor support to selected number of Focus clubs
· FAW Trust staff mentor support to Development Clubs
· Grow Your Club Workshops
· Webinars
· ‘How to’ Guides
· Best practice e-newsletters

About the workshop

A workshop packed with informative ideas and help on how to make your football club vibrant, visible and viable, provide great experiences, recruit more players and people and communicate better.

Community football clubs are facing strong challenges in order to survive and grow in an increasingly competitive and demanding market. How to attract new members and retain the existing ones, become a hub of the community, grow sponsorship revenue, improve the social life of the club, increase media coverage, benefit from new technology, introduce new revenue streams…

In order to survive and grow football clubs must ‘listen to people’s lives’ and adopt new ways of running their clubs. They need to become more welcoming to attract and retain members and volunteers and they must ‘speak people’s’ language’ and communicate with them in a modern and engaging way.

The workshop will focus on the practical issues of setting up and developing a vibrant, visible and viable Community Football Club, regardless of size and location.

The presenter will draw from hundreds of best practice case studies from community-based, volunteer-run sports clubs from across a number of different sports and countries.

Programme:

• Get the vision right for your club
• Learn to love change
• Become a more welcoming club
• Build and maintain positive relationships with new and existing partners
• How to promote your club and attract new members
• Introduce innovative ways of engaging with your customers and your community
• Learn how to run your club effectively and efficiently
• Develop new ways of working in order to generate new income streams
• How to manage a vibrant community sports club by developing your culture and skills
• Attract and retain skilled and passionate volunteers
• Become well connected to your community
• How to best assess your potential for working with community partners – what are your assets, relationships and skills?

Information about FAW Trust More Than A Club – developing enterprising football clubs across Wales

At the workshop, you will also receive information about this innovative support programme where clubs can apply to become part of a bespoke support programme where they will be inspired and mentored to become more enterprising.

The FAW Trust

The FAW Trust is responsible for the development of football in Wales, from grassroots to national level. For more than 20 years, it’s been our job to work with the Football Association of Wales to protect, promote and develop the game of football to achieve our joint vision of:-

Football for everyone, everywhere in Wales

About the presenter, Svend Elkjaer

Holding a Master in Business Administration, MBA, Svend founded the Sports Marketing Network (SMN) in 2005 for people involved with the commercial, community and marketing issues across all sports and physical activity; be it a club, governing body, local authority or private sports deliverer.

Over the last eight years, more than 4,000 sports providers have benefitted from SMN’s services attending our workshops and presentations, being mentored or receiving consultancy. SMN has also advised, consulted and trained a number of organisations and public bodies including the RFU, FA, Cricket Scotland, Amateur Swimming Association, British Gymnastics, Sport Wales, England Golf, England Athletics, sportscotland, etc.