Getting more people active Oxfordshire

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Getting more people active

How to attract more people into our clubs, centres, parks and events

 

9.00 am – 4.00 pm, 10th December 2021

Exeter Hall, Oxford Road,

Kidlington, OX5 1AB

 

An inspiring and innovative one-day workshop for everyone involved with community sports, physical activity and health & wellness

New challenges and opportunities post-pandemic…

Despite continued efforts, and various initiatives, community sport and physical activity in England has not managed to significantly increase participation among people with different attributes and backgrounds (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion) in a meaningful way.

Also, we continue to see those groups lag behind their white counterparts in terms of being physically active and living long and healthy lives.

The sporting landscape has changed enormously in recent years. Government and community expectations for good governance, integrity, equality, member protection and child safeguarding means that providing safe, fair and inclusive sporting environments is no longer an aspiration, but an imperative.

The demographic of the communities in which sport operates has also changed dramatically. Our culturally, linguistically and gender diverse communities are looking for sporting options and experiences that celebrate diversity, promote inclusion, and most importantly, make people feel like they belong.

Getting-more-people-active-Oxfordshire-10.12.202

Community sport needs to adopt a new mindset and learn a new skill set – taking the best from successful social enterprises and the hospitality sector.  It has to recognise that sport operates in the experience business and that it is competing for people’s leisure time and money and has to attract people away from online shopping, watching Love Island, apathy, etc. by providing better experiences for each customer segment.

Life is changing and providers within community sport have to change with it, full stop. Or even better – if you listen to people and their lives you should be able to anticipate the changes in their needs and wants. You can then adapt your offering and service so you are always that half a step ahead. 

 We need more welcoming activators – not more technical coaches

 For many people, great coaching is roughly 10% technical skill, 20% being reactive and able to think on your feet and about 70% being nice to people. In their research into the sporting workforce published in 2017, London Sport asked almost 2000 regular Londoners what they’d mostly be looking for in a sports leader and things like ‘focused on fitness’ and ‘focused on technique’ came pretty far down the list. What came out consistently on top were qualities like ‘motivating’, ‘friendly’ and ‘not going to judge me’.

Increasingly there has to be a focus on improving customer experience, developing more efficient systems and ensuring a sustainable balance between sporting ambitions and economic resources.  This calls for a new mindset and skill set – it is no longer enough to have passion for your club and sport; you need competencies.

You are not ‘just a sports place’

You are in the experience business

I guess most people who work in sport and active leisure sector do so because they love their sport, but in reality, their key role is to provide great sporting and customer experiences which people will want to return to. We do compete for people’s leisure time and money, so if you want to attract people away from the shopping centres, watching Love Island, apathy etc. we must provide a better alternative.  So welcoming people, the right social life, friendly, competent coaches/instructors and clean toilets are not just after-thoughts, they are key parts of the experience you provide, as is a welcoming handshake and a smile accompanied with a “Welcome to our place.”

 We believe, and increasingly research proves, that you simply have to consistently provide consumer experiences that people will want to join – and pay for as customers.  Because that’s what they are: Customers.  Regardless of whether you are coaching in a sports club, trying to attract 50 more people to your local club or leisure centre, you can grow by focusing on your customers. Listen to them and provide them with a better experience.  And the good news is that it does not have to cost a penny.

 A workshop with exciting, practical content delivered in an engaging way…

 This workshop will provide you thoughts, tools and to-dos that you use there and then to get more people active.

It will cover

  •  Being a great experience provider
  • People are different. Some are nervous, some indifferent, some energetic and a whole range of other things, Whatever the person type, they all have to be motivated; often in different ways. In addition, there can be many different stakeholders: participants, members, parents, officials and other coaches amongst others. This section will focus on how to communicate effectively with all of these different groups. They will all want great experiences but that means different things to different people. Opportunities for using social media to stay in touch with people (in line with appropriate safeguarding rules) will also be highlighted.
  • Physical activity does not have to take place in a club or leisure centre Many ‘sports’ places deter inactive people (do they really want all those unfit and non-sporty people there?

 

  • “thinking differently is the key to getting all parts of society active”
  • Identify
  • Work with Community Connectors – People with a special gift for bringing people and communities together
  • Take your project into your community – shopping centres, community events, housing estates, parks
  • Think of the whole experience of joining your club: (Moment Mapping)
  • Be more than just a place for being active
  • How to run a really open Open Day
  • The three 2s – The Simplest Guide Ever to Grow the Number of People at Your Club. 2 seconds: First impressions count. 2 minutes (welcome) 2 hours (the whole experience)

This workshop is aimed at

  • The existing workforce helping them to develop and encourage a new way of thinking within the current workforce
  • New providers attracting a new type of delivery agent from outside the traditional sport sector
  • Social entrepreneurs stepping forward and support their ideas

 

How community sport and physical activity can become more diverse and inclusive

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How community sport and physical activity can attract more people, partners and funding by becoming more diverse and inclusive

Despite continued efforts, and various initiatives, community sport and physical activity in most places has not managed to significantly increase participation among people with different attributes and backgrounds (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion) in a meaningful way.
 
Diversity is the mix of peoples’ different attributes and backgrounds and a good way is to think about diversity is to think about your local community. Does your club/centre reflect the diversity of your local community? Diversity is the mix of people, inclusion is trying to get this mix to all work together in harmony.

Representing your members and your community?

Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) is an important sports body in Australia due to the importance of life on the beaches in Australia and the many resultant accidents in the water.

40% of drowning accidents happen to people born outside the country as people from Somalia, Afghanistan and so on often can’t swim and understand the dangers of the sea. 

Also, 43% of the 140.000 members of SLSA are females, so all told one can only wonder over the composition of the SLSA board and how they are engaging with 43% of their members and a large sector of the Australian community?

How are things at your place when it comes to representing your members and your community?

It’s both about people and money

Being a inclusive, diverse and equitable place where people of all backgrounds can feel they belong and are part of something good is fantastic. But another great reason is something more prosaic; Money.

Here are some estimates of the purchasing power of some of our minorities.

The pink pound

Pink money describes the purchasing power of the LBGT+ community. With the rise of the gay rights pink money has gone from being a fringe or marginalised market to a thriving industry in many parts of the Western world such as the USA and UK. Many businesses and places now specifically cater to gay customers, including nightclubs, shops, restaurants, and even taxicabs; the demand for these services stems from common discrimination by traditional businesses and places.

In 2019, LGBT adults globally held a combined buying power of approximately $3.7 trillion and the UK gay market is worth an estimated £6 billion per year.

The Blue pound

The spending power of people with disabilities is really rather sizeable. There are about 11 million disabled people in the UK and it is generally estimated that they spend around 80 billion pounds per year. If businesses design stylish mobility products, they will benefit. If shops and restaurants provide quality access and disabled facilities, they will do the same.

The ethnic pound

1 in 6 individuals living in the UK are from an ethnic minority background and they spend £145 billion in the economy, yet only 1 in 5 companies are reaching out to them as consumers

How diverse and inclusive and representative of your members
and your community is your board?

So, how to start your journey towards becoming a more diverse and inclusive place


First, this is not about policies – it’s about developing a welcoming culture and experiences for everyone.

We can all download some wonderful policies and then claim that we are diverse and inclusive. But it is about how everyone within your club, group, facility sports body behave and welcome people from the whole community.

It all starts at the door – how do new people feel when they stand outside your place for the first time?
Is this how a new person feels when they stand outside your place for the first time?

Now imagine you are this young girl.

Yesterday, she watched a short video about your sport and thought she would like to give it a go. After some toing and froing, she did find your website
(does your club have a vibrant social media presence where this girl can see whether she knows somebody there?)

It was a bit difficult to find out exactly when she could come to the club as a newcomer, what she should wear, whether she needed to bring her own equipment…all those questions that most of would struggle to answer before going somewhere for the first time.

She managed to get to where your club trains and there she is standing no doubt feeling apprehensive.  Three members have just walked past her, chatting away, all dressed in the ‘right gear’. Honestly, I don’t think anybody would be very surprised if she decided to go back home, never to be seen again at your club.

I am sure this wouldn’t happen at your club. I am sure there would be somebody who would make sure that this girl would be made to feel really welcome, introduced to people, join a ‘Get Into Session etc.

Is this how a new person feels when they stand outside your place for the first time?

Now imagine you are this young girl.

Yesterday, she watched a short video about your sport and thought she would like to give it a go. After some toing and froing, she did find your website
(does your club have a vibrant social media presence where this girl can see whether she knows somebody there?)

Welcoming and enterprising parks and green/blue spaces

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Welcoming and enterprising parks and
green/blue spaces

4 webinars
19th February, 19th March, 16th April 21st May 2021

Conference
16th July, 2021
Midlands Arts Centre, Birmingham

Developing vibrant, visible and viable
green/blue
places for all
 #MoreThanAPark  #OutdoorEnterprise

The Natural Health Service – an innovative
collaboration focusing on what the great outdoors can do for our bodies and minds

Putting parks and green/blue spaces at the forefront of thinking about how we emerge from the pandemic stronger – socially, economically and environmentally. 

However, not all groups in society engage with parks and green/blue spaces. These groups are often those less active and experience a range of health inequalities.

Does the design of parks and green spaces alienate and exclude some groups? Does the design of traditional sport and outdoor recreation in these spaces perpetuate the problem?

Post Covid-19, this context also creates an opportunity to put parks and green/blue spaces at the forefront of thinking about how we emerge from the pandemic stronger; making the most out of our green and blue infrastructure.

We also appreciate that budgets for the sector have seen a steep decline and there is increasing pressure for managers to deal with an increasing number of visitors and smaller budgets. As a result, often time and resources spent on income generation, marketing, community engagement and customer services are limited. How can we raise the profile of green/ blue space and co-create solutions across sectors?

 

So, this webinar series and conference will provide you with thoughts, tools to-dos to develop vibrant, visible and viable green and blue spaces for the whole community.
The series will cover areas such as:

Throughout the series you will be presented with best practice case-studies on how managers of blue and green spaces have developed successful initiatives in this area.

This innovative series is aimed at representatives from wildlife trusts, parks, social and sports development and other departments at our local authorities, social prescribers, public health, trusts, social enterprises, community groups and health and wellbeing bodies.

Welcoming and enterprising parks and green/blue spaces 10 am  BST 19th February
An informative and engaging free webinar

#MoreThanAPark #OutdoorEnterprise
Natalie Ganpatsingh, Founder, Nature Nurture CIC
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network

This webinar will introduce the participants to the many opportunities that exist for developing more innovative and enterprising ways of attracting more people, from all parts of society to access and enjoy the outdoors.
Natalie Ganpatsingh and Svend Elkjaer will draw upon their considerable experience and expertise in developing and delivering programmes and initiatives which can make a real difference for our green/blue places.
 

The webinar will also introduce participants to the rest of the Natural Health Service webinar and conference programme.

3 one-hour Welcoming and enterprising parks and green/blue spaces webinars 

3 webinars, Friday 19th March , Friday 16th April and Friday 21st May 2021 10.00 am BST

#MoreThanAPark #OutdoorEnterprise
Natalie Ganpatsingh, Founder, Nature Nurture CIC
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network

How to develop our parks into becoming community hubs, addressing health inequalities and become #MoreThanAPark 10 am  BST 19th March 2021

How to best assess your potential for working with community partners – what are your assets, relationships and skills?
Parks should be for the people and their communities. Successful green/blue places embrace and welcome everybody around them and are designed to engage a range of groups and reduce health inequalities. How can we forge partnerships between local authorities, community and conservation groups, to support local stewardship of these spaces for people and wildlife? Well managed parks help reduce inequalities and bring people together, including new audiences.

This webinar will draw upon experiences from people in trhe UK and across the world, involved with creating community-based outdoor spaces that are welcoming, inclusive and diverse places for long-standing users as well as newcomers.  

How to develop environmentally and sustainable, income-generating initiatives that will also attract new users and visitors 10 am BST  16th April  2021

Outdoor spaces that run carefully-designed events and initiatives can often the income required to maintain, improve and develop their facilities.  In many cases do we also see those attract new visitors and users and help change some of the perceptions of green/blue places amongst some non-users.

This webinar will also cover how blue/green spaces can support the local economy and run festivals, concerts, competitions…carefully staged respecting the environmental sustainability of the outdoors.

How Silkeborg, Denmark’s Outdoor Capital are growing  10 am  BST 21st May 2021
Heiko Buch-Illing, CEO, Silkeborg Outdoor Institute

Silkeborg is the self-pronounced outdoor capital of Denmark and is in the process of accelerating this position to attract even more outdoor-enthusiasts to Silkeborg.  The Council will now transform the outdoor into something that is more than just tourism, but something that plays a central role in the Council’s vision, and the development and outdoor strategy

The Council has now established the Outdoor Institute whose session is to act as the outdoor potential facilitator. They believe that the outdoors has a great unrealised potential as a driver for the enhancement of health, education and well-being, and by gathering the top minds we work towards realizing this potential.
The Institute acts as a facilitator between researchers, practitioners and business to deploy the best practices within the domain

Heiko will cover how best to develop a more wide-ranging and enterprising outdoor sector and engage with new partners and providers.

Throughout the webinars, you will be presented with best practice case-studies on how managers of blue and green spaces have developed successful initiatives in this area.

These innovative webinars are aimed at representatives from wildlife trusts, parks, social and sports development and other departments at our local authorities, social prescribers, public health, trusts, social enterprises, community groups and health and wellbeing bodies

Natalie is Founder/Director of Nature Nuture CIC whose mission is to support wellbeing and wildlife by connecting people with the wild spaces on their doorsteps. It is an award winning community organisation, enabling people to connect with wild spaces
They believe that a big part of the solution lies in unleashing the symbiotic relationship between people and nature. They believe that people need nature, nature needs people and that there are multiple conduits to nature.

In 2019 they won the national Institute of Outdoor Learning’s ‘Community Development Award’.
As well as running Nature Nurture she is the Nature Lead for Dr. William Bird’s company Intellint Health  Her role is to co-design interventions to help people people maintain physical activity in urban nature, as a legacy to the Beat the Street mass participation physical activity programme. 

Svend is Founder/Director of the Sports Marketing Network which is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.

Sports Marketing Network, the organisers

Sports Marketing Network is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.

 

If you want to discuss how you can develop social innovation in sport, please get in touch.
Svend Elkjar +44 (0) 1423 326 660 svend@smnuk.com