Announcing The GreenSport Network

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The GreenSport Network

driving sustainability across community sport and physical activity

Bringing together community sports bodies, clubs, organisers, and from across the world, exchanging practical ideas and experiences on how to reduce the carbon footprint from community sport.

 

Small steps can make a big difference

Three launch webinars 1st, 8th and 15th December, all at 10 am GMT

 To book your places go here

The dream scenario…getting more people active while reducing CO2 emissions

At present, there is a global need to reduce climate gas emissions, and at the same time there is a global call for increased physical activity – so how do we square that circle and develop community sports facilities and events that are both welcoming and sustainable?

 We are also experiencing that many people now, and not just Generation Zers, expect the places where they go such as clubs, centres and events demonstrate sustainable behaviour if they want them to come back. So, we would like to suggest that by driving sustainability across community sport and physical activity we can become relevant to and attract more, new, participants.

 Get going on the sustainability journey, step by step

 There is also scope for demystifying the whole concept, model and journey on how to get going on the sustainability journey, step by step. So, information-sharing and story-telling are indeed important factors in motivating and helping community sports providers to getting started on their ‘green’ journey.

 We have seen some great examples where smaller clubs have ‘seen the light’ and then gradually start selling local organic products, replace lights with LED lighting, switch over to a renewable energy supplier, switch mechanical equipment over to electric, vegan food options to meat-free Mondays, installing bike parks and give discounts to anyone who arrives by bike, public transport or electric car.

 The list goes on and on, and The GreenSport Network will share all those ideas and experiences from community sport from across the world.

 The GreenSport Network will bring together bodies, clubs, organisers, sports and community facilities from across the world and exchange ideas and experiences on how to deliver climate change within community sport, in all sorts of ways.

 We will bring together practitioners, academics, industry experts, facilities managers from across the world together to exchange ideas, case studies and experiences.

 We will be running webinars, workshops, conferences and study tours, and, over time, become the information hub and go-to source for community sports providers who are working hard to reduce their carbon footprint.

 The GreenSport Network will collect and disseminate examples of best practice from community sports providers at all stages of their development in becoming environmentally sustainable We will help train potential green sports providers how to develop and run sustainable activities.

 Green sport needs champions and The GreenSport Network will highlight the great work done by so many people within the sector and ensure that they will act as role models and beacons.

Three launch webinars 1st, 8th and 15th December, all at 10 am

1st December 10 am GMT

Getting started – An introduction to how community sport can become more environmentally sustainable

This 45-minute webinar will provide you with a quick background as to how we can link physical activity promotion and climate action.  We will then give you some ideas and tips on how any community sports provider can reduce their climate change impact. We will give you examples from non-league football club Shoreham FC who are focusing on the main contributors to climate change energy, transport and food/catering. The first steps include a complete refit of all their lighting with low energy LEDs, not using single plastic and introducing vegan food, amongst others.

Hanwell FC, whose first team play in the Isthmian League – South Central Division (level 8 of the English football pyramid) have just launched Green Geordies, with a commitment to become a net zero carbon football club by 2030.  They have already invested in a climate resilient pitch and installed automated LED lighting among other upgrades.

 Shoreham FC’s bar menu feature vegan options

We will also cover how Castle Climbing Centre in London are committed to preserving their rock faces and the planet, promoting biodiversity and sustainable practices and addressing social inequalities. Whether this is through supporting organisations such as the Dorset Bolt Fund, striving towards carbon neutral operations, investing in a permaculture garden and vegetarian café or partnering with ethical, sustainable suppliers.

We will talk about how Pentyrch Rugby Football Club has been using solar panels throughout the pandemic thanks to funding from the National Lottery and how they are

One of the pioneers of sustainability in sport, Forest Green Rovers have experienced an increase in sponsorship revenue as companies and brands who share their values are looking for a partner – that could work for you too”

And we will also give you examples of how event organisers are working with participants to reduce any waste being dropped and/left after the races and runs.

8th December 10 am GMT

Experiences from outside community sport and physical – that we can learn from others

At this webinar we will look at how sectors such as tourism, hospitality and arts and culture are going green and reducing their climate impact – there are many great initiatives that community sport and physical activity providers can learn from.

You will also hear from Jo Little, Business Development Manager at Planet Mark

Planet Mark certification is a recognised symbol of sustainability progress. It demonstrates a business’ commitment to measuring and reducing their carbon emissions, ultimately contributing to their environmental, social and governance.

Jo will talk about how for many brands in the sports and leisure industry there is a direct link with the natural world. As our climate changes, our relationship with sport and leisure as we understand it could be compromised. Many sports and leisure brands have realised they can be part of the solution, creating business with a focus on climate to promote healthy and future-ready experiences for their customers.

15th December 10 am GMT

How to get going internally with reducing your climate change impact – setting up n a powerful group for change

We will talk about how to take the first steps on your green journey and how to get people on board and buy into the project 

We will then be hearing from Hannah Amor, Plastics and sustainability project officer at Environment Agency. She will be talking about how to prevent plastic pollution in sport, recycling,

The Environment Agency’s Plastics and Sustainability team will be discussing how sports clubs, venues and events can reduce the amount of avoidable single-use plastic they use. Bringing participants, fans, and members along on the journey. By reducing avoidable plastic sport can play its part in tackling the climate emergency and protecting the planet for future generations. 

Mark Curtin, CEO The Lord’s Taverners, the famous cricket charity, will talk about how they are shipping recycled cricket kit to a variety of places including Nigeria, Greece, the Lebanon and Moldova and are currently in the process of fulfilling 6 more cricket and 2 football applications.

Turn online shopping to sustainable fundraising source

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Turn online shopping and the power of your community into a long term, free, and sustainable fundraising source

 

Webinar Tuesday 25th October 7.30 pm BST

We have seen many examples where sports clubs have benefitted in terms of membership and income from playing a stronger role in their communities. And with a stronger focus on sport’s ability to change people’s lives, there is an even stronger scope for sports clubs to play a bigger role in their communities and the lives of people around them and become #MoreThanAClub.

Also as sports clubs must develop a sustainable income model – getting away from the panicky Dash for Cash, literally begging for money. The key is to look at the whole operation and ambition of your club and then identify and implement projects which can help grow your income to match your requirements.

It is key to integrate the sporting aspects and ambitions and your income generation as you must ensure that all your club’s operations are financially sustainable.

That will also be helped by becoming a hub for your community as more people will take an interest in your club and want to support you and take part in your activities and events.

This webinar will give you

Thoughts, Tools, and To-dos on how

you can utilise your community involvement to help grow

your income from online shopping.

Turn online shopping to sustainable fundraising source

Project Kickstart Cymru Getting started in the ‘new normal’ world 

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Getting Wales moving, involved in sport and physically active in the ‘new normal’ world

An initiative designed to inspire and support the community sport and physical activity sector in Wales to modernise, become more digital, collaborate amongst themselves and with the non-sports partners and play a bigger role in the community they serve post the pandemic

Webinars
11th March, 15th April, 13th May, 17th June 2021

Conference 13th July 2021 

In Partnership with:

The coronavirus crisis has presented us with challenges and changes to all aspects of our lives and the way that our community sports bodies and providers operate and will be operating in the future.

A key question is how the new ‘normal’ going to look like and how do we respond.

Will the way that we enjoy sport and physical activity be changing and, if so, how can we adapt to that?  We are already experiencing many changes in people’s behaviour in the way we exercise (or not) and we are also seeing many great examples of community spirit, some of them, but perhaps not enough, coming from community sport.

Many community sport and activity providers are in danger of not playing a big enough role in people’s lives right now and are not at the front of people’s minds.  When all this is over and people’s habits have changed those who were visible during the crisis will have a much bigger chance of regaining, or even improving, their reputation and standing in their communities. 

And how ready are you to adapt and change your offering, service and way of delivery?  Do we listen and learn?

There is now a strong need to reimagine and reinvent to focus on new thinking and innovation within community sport and physical activity. But the question is who and how this innovation should be developed and delivered. Do we expect our existing providers and bodies to quickly adapt and develop an innovation culture and start thinking ‘young’ and become positive disruptors to themselves?  Or do we expect the emergence of many new innovators who will develop and deliver these exciting initiatives? Where will they come from? How will they be regarded by the incumbents? 
How do we transform our sports facilities into real hubs for their communities that attract more inactive people in a vibrant, visible and viable way? For some that will require a completely new way of thinking going from facility management to facility enterprise.
As well as money, for this fantastic opportunity to be fully realised considerable elements of motivation, inspiration, learning and developing will be required.

 This is why we are proposing:

Project Kickstart Cymru

How to deliver enterprising community sport and facility enterprise in the new ‘normal’ world
Strategies, policies, experiences, real stories and successes to be told,
lessons to be learnt, ideas and experiences to be shared.

 
This programme will be serving::

  • Sports bodies, providers and clubs developing new formats, tools of engagement and communication, community partnerships, income streams and use of digital media  
  • Sports facilities/leisure trusts/local authorities transforming themselves into community hubs which are attractive and welcoming to the whole community and not just active people by becoming #MoreThanSport 
  • Community/non-sport organisations, such as housing, patient associations, park authorities,  the social business and enterprise sector, health boards and outdoor recreation providers who are using their engagement and connection with their communities to activate and engage local residents
  • National organisations/|Higher and Further Education bodies – those that support the activators, the doers and the innovators.  – such as Sport Wales, National Resource Wales, Public Health Wales, Universities, Colleges, Colegau Cymru, Wales Co-operative, Social Business Wales, etc…

The programme will ask questions such as:

  • How do we engage with the many inactive people who are not active through conventional methods and channels? Do we need new partners and providers and what role can the current sports bodies play?
  • How do we engage the local community and promote community leadership and play our part in the fabric of our local communities? How do we develop and deliver an innovative range of sporting and physical activity opportunities, attracting people of all ages and abilities?
  • How do develop an environment that encourages, inspires and supports people to be active?
  • How do we bridge the gap between ‘sport for sport’s sake’ and ‘sport for change’ and ensure that there is a common vision across all parts of the sector in Wales?
  • How do we encourage social and commercial entrepreneurs to step forward and become part of this new movement and help to develop innovative solutions?
  • How do we help the current providers and bodies to become more innovative and enterprising and to start thinking ‘wrong’?
  • What does community sport look like in the future? How can our community sports providers change and adapt to be relevant in a changing world?
  • Sport or physical activity – is there a difference and does it matter?
  • Who is going to get the inactive active?  How do we develop a more welcoming and relevant workforce?
  • How do the health sector view sport and physical activity?  How can the two collaborate to get more Welsh people moving?
  • What is the role of the modern governing body of sport? Just running their sport or being a community partner or something in between?
  • How do we encourage innovation and enterprise to develop new initiatives to get more people active?
  • What does real success look like?

The programme – four monthly webinars and a one-day conference

4 Webinars
The one-hour webinars will feature an overview and introduction from the organisers and then feature one or two presentations and case studies from providers and organisations from across Wales. 

  • Introducing Project Kickstart Cymru Getting started in the ‘new normal’ world 1 pm BST 11th March 2021
  • How to embrace technology and build on people’s new habits 1 pm  BST 15th April 2021
  • Community Engagement – how to become a real community partner and #MoreThanSport 1 pm BST 13th May 2021
  • Developing an innovative and enterprising approach 10 am BSTon 17th June 2021

Conference
13th July 2021

 
This conference will bring together all the providers and bodies with an interest in reimagining and reinventing how Wales can move forward and create a more healthy, active and engaged Wales in the ‘new normal’ world.
 

Fees
 
The first webinar is free to attend.  
The next three webinars all together cost £35 to attend (£30 for members of the Sports Marketing Network.

To attend the actual conference, and the three webinar costs £155.00 (£130 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network)

The organisers

Tom Overton – is a highly experienced sport, physical activity and community development professional and has more than 20 years’ experience working in various roles across the public sector – most recently as a senior leader in Sport Wales as Head of Community Sport and strategic lead for governance and leadership.
 He brings considerable experience of the sport and physical activity landscape across the UK and detailed knowledge and understanding of the public sector and political landscape in a devolved context; particularly the broader impact that sport has in tackling inequalities and delivering wider social outcomes.

He has recently set up a bespoke consultancy, ‘Dysgu’, to support individuals and organisations to be the best they can be. His recent/current clients include sportscotland, Torfaen Leisure Trust, FAWT, Cardiff City – House of Sport, Bridgend County Borough Council and the Active Black Country Sports Partnership. He is also a part-time lecturer at undergraduate and postgraduate level with the University of South Wales & Cardiff Met and a non-exec director with Welsh Athletics and Show Racism the Red Card. It’s all about people!

Sports Marketing Network, run by Svend Elkjaer, is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.

Community Football Summit 2021

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Bringing together everyone involved with developing and delivering grassroots football in the new normal world
 
Webinars
16th February, 16th March, 13th April, 18th May 2021
 
Conference
24th June 2021, Technique Stadium, Chesterfield FC

A myriad of community football providers and formats – adapting to new habits, technology and lifestyles

Community and grassroots football play a huge role in people’s lives, in sport and our communities.  Whether played in a traditional club, a community setting, a small-sided facility or somewhere else, or even online, football has the scope to engage with more people than any other sport.
Following on from the Covid-19 pandemic and the lockdown community football is facing some huge challenges but also some big opportunities for providing great football experiences delivered in many different ways, in unusual places creating new experiences and communities. The developments of the changes have been accelerated by the corona crisis.  

There is a wide range of providers and settings with different focus whether it is talent pathways, social integration or fun and enjoyment and it seems that there is precious little dialogue and engagement between the various providers of community football.

We are seeing an increase in the different formats of football, be it futsal, footgolf, walking football, e-football or freestyle and they are all attracting players from a wide range of backgrounds, dedication and talents. It has been estimated that more than 50% of football is played away from clubs.

There is also a wide range of football for change programmes where football is used as a lever to engage with disengaged groups to improve people’s health, educational attainment, and social inclusion.  They are often delivered by dedicated community groups and others who see football as a means to an end and not ‘just football for football’s sake’.

For the football governing bodies all these developments represent huge challenges and opportunities. Should they ignore them and stick with the traditional formats and clubs as the main providers or should they embrace all these developments and even consider to coordinate them all is a question which is important to community football at all levels.

So this is an exciting, innovative and flourishing sector with a larger number of different groups and providers involved, often doing great work, but with relatively little cross-sector engagement and communication. Until now – a connected grassroots football sector is what the Community Football Summit is trying to achieve.

Bringing grassroots football together

The Summit will bring together people with an interest in community football from across a wide range of groups and bodies together. They will learn from each other, share ideas and experiences and develop new partnerships all to build a vibrant, visible and viable community football sector.

Who should attend the Community Football Summit
Football governing bodies, schools, colleges, community groups, coaching companies, holiday camp organisers, football for change organisations, club representatives, charities, coach developers and leisure trusts.

Webinars and conference – all useful, practical stuff

 The four one-hour webinars will bring together anyone interested in developing a stronger network and skills base together with case studies and presentations from the grassroots football scene
culminating in a one-day conference (observing the COVID-restrictions at the time).

4 interactive and engaging webinars

Fees

The first webinar is free to attend.

The next three webinars cost £45 to attend (£35 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network (SEN)
To attend the actual conference, and the three webinar costs £155.00 (£130 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network)

Community football in the ‘new normal’, 16th February 2021 10 am BST
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network

3 Webinars 

Community football focusing on the person 16th March, 10 am BST
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network
Joey Peters, Founder, Game Play Learn Game Play Learn | Learning Through Games and Sports

Bringing back the joy to children’s sport 13th April 2021, 10 am BST
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network
Ken Willner, Founder, Yellow for Yelling Yellow for Yelling

Community football for all, regardless of background or health 18th May 10 am BST
Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network
Abdulsalam Juma, Project Officer, One Culture Football One Culture Football

The organisers

Sports Marketing Network (SMN) is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.
We have been described as positive disruptors and we have worked with a wide range of sport, physical activity and community organisations helping them to adapt, change and become better equipped to the changing landscape.
More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.
Thousands of people involved with community sport and physical activity across the UK and Scandinavia have participated in one of our ‘hot topics’ conferences covering issues such as Innovation and Enterprise in Community Sport, More Disabled People into Sport, More Girls into Sport, Britain’s Active Parks and A Healthier Nation through Sport and Physical Activity, to name a few…

How community sport and physical activity can play a bigger role in social prescribing

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How community sport and physical activity can play
a bigger role in social prescribing

Support, training and mentoring programme for community sports providers such as clubs, social enterprises and community coaches on how to provide great community experiences

4 webinars and a full day conference

18th  February, 18th March, 5th April and 20th May 2021
and conference 8th July, University of Hertfordshire 

Social Prescribing Community Sports programme

Social prescribing is happening…
Social prescribing is designed to support people with a wide range of social, emotional or practical needs, and many schemes are focused on improving mental health and physical wellbeing. Those who could benefit from social prescribing schemes include people with mild or long-term mental health problems, people with complex needs, people who are socially isolated and those with multiple long-term conditions who frequently attend either primary or secondary health care.

These groups have traditionally been less likely to be involved and engaged with community sports providers.

Schemes delivering social prescribing can involve a range of activities that are typically provided by voluntary and community sector organisations. Examples include volunteering, arts activities, group learning, gardening, befriending, cookery, healthy eating advice and a range of sports.  

Social prescribing is being introduced in many countries, but New Zealand has been using, what they call, green prescriptions for encouraging patients to be active outdoors for decades. The scheme is implemented at the primary care level where a physician or nurse generally assess the needs of patients and provide tangible recommendations in a prescription.

In the UK there is an increasing focus on the issue and at the end of 2020 there are 1300 link workers, who work alongside GPs to steer the patients in the right direction of ab appropriate activity or service and the plan is to increase that number to 4500.
It also important to emphasise to community sports provides that social prescribing is often as much about mental health than physical health and this is not about getting more players to win the league but about attracting and welcoming people who want to become involved and engaged

A big opportunity for community sports providers to play a stronger role in their communities

Some traditional community sports clubs have not been ‘social prescribing ready’, but we also believe that several clubs have got the potential to play a much wider role in their communities.  They just need to be inspired and supported and to receive training and guidance.

We know from our research into social prescribing projects in the UK and Denmark that there are some wrong perceptions amongst some people involved with community sports clubs. Two are that a) participants are there to be ‘treated’ and b) the club volunteers are ‘not health workers’ so we must explain what social prescribing and what it involves for the clubs, in layman’s terms.

It also recommended that we encourage the clubs to appoint Ambassadors or Welcomers to ensure a welcoming reception and smooth pathway into the club. We also recommend that these should be people ‘who look like me’, so the newcomers feel they are being accepted.

A part of such a process involves engagement with social prescribing link workers, GPs and other health workers to highlight the important role that local community sports clubs can play in delivering social prescription projects. Presentations, meetings and social media could play an important role in that process.

Social prescribing by community sports providers has the potential to become a UK wide programme with multiple pathways, including corporate and self-referral mechanisms into community activities to improve physical and mental health. Such a scheme should be designed and developed with the health sector and relevant delivery and research partners, working with the Active Partnerships, governing bodies and CVS networks amongst others.

Webinars and conference – all useful, practical stuff

The four one-hour webinars will bring together anyone interested in developing a stronger network and skills base together with case studies and presentations from social prescribers culminating in a one-day conference (observing the COVID-restrictions at the time).

4 interactive and engaging webinars

Introduction to social prescribing and community sport

18th February 2021 10 am BST

How social prescribing can support people with a wide range of social, emotional or practical needs, and many schemes are focused on improving mental health and physical wellbeing.
It also important to emphasise to community sports provides that social prescribing is often as much about mental health than physical health and this is not about getting more players to win the league but about attracting and welcoming people who want to become involved and engaged.  

This webinar will give participants key information on social prescribing and how link workers and community sports providers can work together

3 Webinars

Connecting Communities 1

18th March 10 am BST

How community sports and physical activity providers can engage and enable communities to be active, move more and get involved in sport.

Social prescribing in physical activity is already happening and here’s how. Various community sports providers are already delivering services for their communities and serving inactive and unengaged people. They often use innovative, yet simple, methods and solutions and make people feel really welcome and included. Often, they also attract more volunteers and community partners and become #MoreThanAClub and #MoreThanSport and they benefit greatly from that.

This webinar will provide participants with unique thoughts, tools and to-dos on how to connect with their communities

Connecting Communities 2

15th April, 10 am BST

Raising the profile of community sports and physical activity providers as places and partners for engaging with inactive and unengaged people

It has been claimed that community sports providers could, and should, be more involved with providing social prescribing services and that they are not visible enough with social prescribers.
So, there are great opportunities and scope for GPs and link workers to increase their awareness and engagement with local clubs and groups providing community sport and physical activity.

This webinar will highlight how social prescribers and link workers are already engaging with community sport and physical activity providers and how everybody is benefitting from that.

 

Connecting Communities 3

20th May, 10 am BST

Developing new partnerships and initiatives to engage more people in innovative ways.

Social prescribing by community sports providers has the potential to become a UK wide programme with multiple pathways, including corporate and self-referral mechanisms into community activities to improve physical and mental health. Such a scheme should be designed and developed with the health sector and relevant delivery and research partners, working with the Active Partnerships, governing bodies and CVS networks amongst others. But we could also benefit from developing partnerships with major retailers as they have community engagement, customers, branding and car parks and often employ Community Champions and with other community-focused businesses.

This webinar will give participants case-studies and ideas on how to take their social prescribing programme to a different level.

Growing grassroots sport in Australia – for whom, by whom?

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Growing grassroots sport in Australia – for whom, by whom?

 New formats, places, people and partners for grassroots sports in Australia

2 free webinars

Friday  11th December 2020, 10 am AEDT

Friday 18th December 2020, 10 am AEDT

 

Across the world, people’s lives are changing faster every day. The explosive growth of social media, more people leading 24/7 lives, the decline of the traditional core family and a culture of more demanding consumers are just some of the trends that are having an impact on our lives.  And as a direct consequence, the way people view and participate in sport and physical activity.

In many countries, the traditional leisure facilities and community sports clubs are therefore facing considerable financial pressure, whilst workout-at-home brands like Peloton, Nautilus and NordicTrack are reporting massive increases in the number of subscribers. Cycling is becoming increasingly popular (In the UK there is a shortage of bikes) and Amazon and Google are joining Apple and many others in launching fitness apps and videos.

We are also seeing some people joining traditional sports clubs in more flexible ways.  In Denmark, they are seeing many families joining clubs but as part of a ‘motionsfællesskab’, or ‘exercise community’ which has proved particularly popular with females who won’t/can’t commit to regular classes. 

We are also experiencing a growing number of non-sports bodies, such as housing, patient associations and social enterprises delivering physical activity programmes to residents, patients and clients, respectively.

These two webinars will highlight different aspects of how you can adapt and change to this ‘new normal world’. Combining thoughts and tools from innovative community sports providers from across the world with case-studies from some of Australia’s most successful grassroots providers these three webinars will bring new thinking and ways to deliver grassroots sports right to your computer screen. At no cost!

In partnership with:

Friday 11th December 2020 10 am AEDT

Creating social innovation in grassroots sport in Australia, Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network. How people and groups are looking to develop and deliver innovative ways to engage with new groups through sport and develop more active and engaged people and a real impact in our communities.

Embracing the power of sport and recreation as a vehicle for inclusion, opportunity and belonging for all members of the community – including, recently arrived migrants, refugees and people seeking asylum. How clubs can shift their model to be inclusive of different groups, grow participation numbers and adapt to hanging community needs, Maia Tua-Davidson, Manager, Welcoming Sport at Welcoming Australia 

Friday 18th December10 am AEDT

Developing partnerships and collaboration in grassroots sports in Australia, Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sports Marketing Network. How to pool a diverse variety of perspectives and ideas; this is what leads to innovation! How to collaborate with others including bodies and people from outside your normal network and sphere – creating shared value.

The work of a child is PLAY, exploring their own unique potential, being safe to fail, having a right to enjoy Sport for the sake of enjoying it, through GAME PLAY LEARN.  Joey Peters, Founder, Game Play Learn

Strong Webinar Line up

Maia Tua-Davidson, Manager, Welcoming Sport

            Joey Peters, Founder,                    Game Play Learn

          Svend Elkjaer, Founder, Sport Marketing Network

Sports Marketing Network, the organisers

Sports Marketing Network is a unique, UK-based organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

We have been described as positive disruptors and we have worked with a wide range of sport, physical activity and community organisations across the world helping them to adapt, change and become better equipped to the changing landscape.