Welcoming Sport

Hits: 40

 

Welcoming Sport –
developing a more welcoming culture across community sport

 

Let’s build an awareness, training, communication and award programme designed to increase diversity and inclusion across community sport

 

 

You can watch a recording of a presentation of some of our thinking around Welcoming Sport here
Despite continued efforts, and various initiatives, community sport and physical activity in most places has not managed to significantly increase participation among people with different attributes and backgrounds (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion) in a meaningful way.

Also, we continue to see those groups lag behind their white counterparts in terms of being physically active and living long and healthy lives.

The sporting landscape has changed enormously in recent years. Government and community expectations for good governance, integrity, equality, member protection and child safeguarding means that providing safe, fair and inclusive sporting environments is no longer an aspiration, but an imperative.

 

How Northumberland Cricket Board (NCB) developed a diverse and inclusive Board

The NCB was formed in 2010 and initially, it comprised white men with either a cricket and/or local authority background.  Russell Perry, the Chair then decided that to become a more relevant and representative group they had to bring in people with a different background and skillset.

They brought the first woman on to the Board, who opened up NCB to the world of social media and stuck a chord with their much younger staff.

The process was led by Claris D’cruz, a local charity barrister/consultant and an NCB Director.

Gradually, they broadened the scope of the members of the Board, challenged groupthink and brought in new contacts and skills, which helped them to engage better with their community, funders and the ECB.

The board now has twelve members, three women, three of Asian descent, four in their forties and two in their thirties.

The demographic of the communities in which sport operates has also changed dramatically. Our culturally, linguistically and gender diverse communities are looking for sporting options and experiences that celebrate diversity, promote inclusion, and most importantly, make people feel like they belong.

We must develop community sports places that are welcoming to everyone and ‘not just people like ourselves’

We must develop pro-active behaviours, options and actions to make people from all backgrounds, ages and abilities feel welcome, respected and that they belong at your club/centre. Being inclusive is about following best practices for what sport/physical activity should be so that everyone can get the most out of it.

Diversity is the mix of peoples’ different attributes and backgrounds and a good way is to think about diversity is to think about your local community. Does your club/centre reflect the diversity of your local community? Diversity is the mix of people, inclusion is trying to get this mix to all work together in harmony.

How Bright Star Boxing attracts non-boxers
One of the over 50s sessions in progress at Brightstar
Bright Star Boxing Academy is unlike any other gym. Set up by founder Joe Lockley in 2015, it started simply as a way to get fit and practise boxing in Shropshire. However, since its inception, the gym has become a pillar of the community, helping people from across the West Midlands to get fit while also tackling mental health issues.
Today Bright Star runs sessions for groups ranging from women who have suffered sexual
abuse to homeless people those young people who are excluded or at risk of exclusion from school and social prescribers.

Every Saturday the gym also hosts ‘Counterpunch’, a group aimed specifically at encouraging males to talk about their mental health.

Counterpunch helps the club reach out to vulnerable people, empower them and make
positive changes to their lives by offering informal mental health support from its coaches – many of whom have experienced mental health problems themselves

Making inclusion happen

Everyone should have the opportunity to be actively involved in whatever sport they choose, in whatever capacity they choose. Each sporting organisation should be committed to being inclusive and open to all members of the UK community regardless of age, gender, disability, cultural or religious background or sexual orientation, or other attributes that may add to any person feeling excluded or isolated.

But the reality is, a tale of missed opportunities still exists. Sports and clubs are missing out on entire groups of potential members, players, administrators and volunteers. More importantly, people who want to play sports feel, for a variety of reasons and barriers, excluded and don’t want to become involved.

Welcome to our club?

Golf club secretary: “Of course, we welcome new members,
as long as their handicap is low enough”

 

Those challenges and opportunities exist within culturally and linguistically diverse populations. gender inclusion, homophobia and sexuality, people with a disability, race-based inclusion and religious vilification.

The Welcoming Sport programme aims to improve on that situation

The six components of the programme:

1. Involvement of NGBs, Active Partnerships, leisure trusts, associations representing the less engaged groups and so on

We propose that all potential stakeholders are invited to intro meetings held at strategic locations across the UK.

 

“Asian communities are an important part of the football landscape and should
be better represented across the game.

It’s like in any business if you’re only selecting from a smaller section of the population then what are you missing?”

Gareth Southgate

The purpose is to secure the buy-in from these organisations many of whom may not have been ‘in the same room’ before although they, and their clients, would benefit considerably from a more welcoming culture and behaviour across community sport.

It is therefore key that they, as far as possible, speak the same language and send out the same messages which, unfortunately, is not always the case. The intro meetings should each run for, say, two hours.

We will present the programme and content and listen to feedback and comments and fine-tune the format and content.

We see these intro meetings as an important element in developing the Welcoming Sport movement.

Flyerz Hockey are drawing disabled people into hockey across the UK

‘Flyerz’ hockey is the name widely associated with grassroots disability, inclusive hockey in Great Britain. There are now more than 20 Flyerz sections across England, Wales and Scotland, providing inclusive hockey for disabled people.

In 2011, Access Sport’s Disability Inclusion Programme was launched to support local community sports clubs to become more inclusive of disabled young people. Access Sport partnered with Waltham Forest Hockey Club to create the first fully inclusive hockey section in England, which was named ‘Forest Flyerz’ and inspired other clubs to introduce ‘Flyerz’ hockey.to Access Sport supports hockey clubs in starting their Flyerz section, providing them with the tools and resources they need in their journey to become inclusive of disabled individuals.

In 2011, Access Sport’s Disability Inclusion Programme was launched to support local community sports clubs to become more inclusive of disabled young people. Access Sport partnered with Waltham Forest Hockey Club to create the first fully inclusive hockey section in England, which was named ‘Forest Flyerz’ and inspired other clubs to introduce ‘Flyerz’ hockey.to Access Sport supports hockey clubs in starting their Flyerz section, providing them with the tools and resources they need in their journey to become inclusive of disabled individuals.

Kate Page, Development Manager for Disability Inclusion at Access Sport says, “don’t hesitate! Don’t overcomplicate. There’s no right time – just do it!”. Adapt only when needed. Try to keep sessions similar to the mainstream sessions – adapt or simplify only when necessary”, wise words we think.

2. Awareness/social media campaign 

In 2016 SMN was commissioned by England Golf to develop and deliver an initiative to stimulate and encourage innovation across golf: #MoreThanGolf.  We recommended to England Golf to start out with a social media and PR campaign, fronted by the then CEO, Nick Pink.
That was the first time this type of campaign had been run by a sports body, and as far as we know, the only NGB that has used social media to engage their stakeholders, invite their input, ideas and generally engage with the world around them.

An email account innovation@englandgolf.com was set up and the campaign received 500 email responses. 

 

Half of those said that “there was nothing wrong with golf”, that “this campaign was waste of time and money” and that “BBC should show every minute of the British Open and then the kids would want to play golf”.

But, the other half thanked England Golf for listening, for inviting ideas etc. and many put forward ideas and suggestions, some of which we would have never thought of ourselves.
One of those email responses then asked:
Some internet research then showed that dogs are welcome at many golf clubs across the world,
but we also heard stories about members being rejected from golf clubs because they brought their dogs and “that was against the rules”.

Full stop. It is worth noting that 30 per cent of UK households have a dog.

Then we were alerted to the fact that you can bring your dog onto the Old Course at St Andrews, the home of golf (peak green fee £195.00).  (If you bring your dog to Sunningdale Golf Club (green fee £275) the dog gets a free sausage). 

So, if your dog is welcome at some of the UK’s most prestigious golf courses, surely all other courses should follow suit.

We then came across this website from Germany where you can book onto golf courses where you can bring your dog. 

Every year in South Shields, outside Newcastle, the world’s largest Dog Walk takes place with 34,000 dogs and their owners, raising £ 1 Mio for doggy charities. Also, 20 National Trust properties run dog walk in aid of Hearing Dogs for the Deaf, so they raise money for a good cause and attract visitors to their properties.

 

 We told those stories at England Golf’s sell-out innovation conference, that SMN organised for them at Villa Park, which brought together 200 people from across golf keen to be inspired to develop new initiatives.

 We propose to a similar social media/PR campaign with a strapline such as #MoreWelcomingSport where we invite ideas and examples on how we can make sport more welcoming, diverse and inclusive. 

 
We reckon that, out there, there are plenty of good examples and ideas that we then can share and highlight through the campaign.
 

Getting females from multi-ethnic communities to play football 

Nagin Ravand is an Afghan refugee whose parents moved to Denmark in 2002, so she was brought up in a very egalitarian ‘Danish-style’ culture. 

Relatively quickly she discovered that she was a good footballer and she never considered that it was unusual in Denmark to see girls playing football wearing a hijab.

When she was 12 the family moved to Gellerup an area in Aarhus, which is a multicultural community where many residents come from countries where females do not normally play football.

So, Nagin started a girls section at a local football club and gradually people got used to seeing this group of females playing football in hijabs she learned how to engage with both the girls and the parents.

When she realised that some of the parents were concerned that their daughters were missing out on their school work due to football, she started study classes alongside the football sessions.

Since then Nagin has won several sports and community awards and is now an ambassador for getting females from multicultural backgrounds to play football.
In between, she is also a second-year student at Aarhus University.

With an adventurous heart and an open mind, she is a true role model, fighting the barriers for girls and women to be active in sports.

 For Nagin, young people from deprived areas must get the same opportunities and experiences as other young people.

”It is important that we give Muhammed and Aamirah something to talk with Svend and Maria about. It is about giving the young people something they can have in common” she points out.

3. Workshop/webinar programme 

Using the combined expertise and experience from SMN together with feedback and ideas gathered during the first two steps of the programme we will develop a series of face to face workshops and follow-up webinars.

Over the years, SMN has developed a toolbox that we tend to use when we develop our courses:

  • Thoughts: Through story-telling, examples and inquisitive questions we challenge the status quo and help you think outside the box and build an edge to growth
  • Tools: We provide you with a wide range of simple tools on how you can achieve best practice, improve and grow the business in simple steps
  • To-Dos: Having decided which tools to use, we can then give you simple templates and action points – to use there and then

At this stage, we reckon there will be a programme with a blend of face-to-face workshops and online webinars.

We propose to offer a 3-hour intro workshop called Welcoming Sport where we go through how providers of community sport can develop and deliver great, welcoming experiences for everyone regardless of their background and skills.

Modules and also webinar topics can include

  • Modernising your board to become more diverse and inclusive
  • How to become a more diverse and inclusive place
  • How to run a really great Open Day for all
  • First impressions count – how to get new people through the door
  • From sports coach to welcoming activator
  • From Performance and Pathway to Pleasure and Participation
  • Using social media to attract and engage people
  • Working in partnership with non-sport community partners
  • Making people wanting to come back by giving them great experiences
  • How to become a hub for your community
No doubt, our engagement  with partners and our social media campaign will bring out other topics and aspects which we will then incorporate into the programme.
Modules and also webinar topics can include

  • Modernising your board to become more diverse and inclusive
  • How to become a more diverse and inclusive place
  • How to run a really great Open Day for all
  • First impressions count – how to get new people through the door
  • From sports coach to welcoming activator
  • From Performance and Pathway to Pleasure and Participation
  • Using social media to attract and engage people
  • Working in partnership with non-sport community partners
  • Making people wanting to come back by giving them great experiences
  • How to become a hub for your community
Mixed Ability Sports breaking down barriers

Mixed Ability Sports (MAS) was conceived to promote social inclusion and meaningful interaction between individuals and groups who wouldn’t necessarily share paths in their local communities. At least not in ‘normal’ circumstances.

Many of their participants have experienced – or still, experience – exclusion, social isolation and segregation daily because of their perceived diversity, and MAS is their only asset.

An asset to their physical, social and mental wellbeing, a space of equality, rights and equal opportunities. A crucial part of their identity.

Mixed Ability sport has the potential for positive impacts at the individual, club and societal level:

  • At the individual level, participants reported both physical and mental health benefits, increased self-confidence and self-determination as well as a sense of belonging in the Mixed Ability team, club or group. For example, one participant stated ‘It’s made me more confident about doing other things. When I start learning new things, and if I haven’t done it before, I get really nervous … and since I’ve come here I don’t feel I get nervous anymore.’ Antony Binns, Mixed Ability boxing participant.
  • At the club level, respondents reported a more inclusive club culture, new members and a membership more representative of the local community, more accessible infrastructure and coach development. A representative from one of the Clubs embracing Mixed Ability said ‘Mixed Ability has transformed our club culture. It makes me wonder how we can make the rest of society more like this!’
  • More broadly, the impacts included the meaningful inclusion of disabled participants in mainstream sport. Also, participants reported shifts in perceptions of dis/ability, a raised awareness of barriers to participation in sport and other areas of society.

4.    Online library resource with guides, case studies and webinar videos

Over the years, SMN has acquired considerable experience with building comprehensive libraries of resources supporting innovation and enterprise within community sport, and our current premium service, Sports Enterprise Network comprises one of the biggest libraries/resources of its kind.

We are proposing that Welcoming Sport, over time, build a similar database/library covering how to deliver welcoming, inclusive and diverse sport with guides, case studies and webinar videos that we are constantly producing for the Welcoming Sport project.

Initially, SMN will produce a 32-page guide on How to become a Welcoming place for sport, which and we will then produce add-on guides and so and build this all-encompassing library covering all aspects of delivering welcoming, inclusive and diverse sport.

 5.    Awards programme with conference and award presentation

In 2015, working with Cricket Scotland on the #MoreThanCricket programme, SMN helped them to introduce an awards programme for their clubs that matched the ambitions
Cricket Scotland had for their clubs and got them away for the traditional awards, for ‘best coach’ and so on.

The new categories were: 

  • Biggest Change-Maker at a Scottish Cricket Club
  • Scotland`s Most Welcoming Cricket Club
  • Best use of `Bite-Sized` Volunteers
  • Best use of Social Media
  • Most Innovative and Effective Income Generation
  • Strongest Community Engagement

The impact was considerable, as the whole support and training programme was also geared towards improving the clubs’ performance in these six areas.
The awards were presented at the annual Club Enterprise Conference.

We would like to propose that we include a Welcoming Sport Award programme in this project
The awards could include: 

  • The overall most welcoming place for sport
  • The most welcoming sports club
  • The most welcoming leisure centre
  • The most welcoming sports project
  • The most diverse and inclusive place for sport
  • Most welcoming coach/instructor in community sport

The awards could be presented at an annual Welcoming Sport conference where we highlight best practices, showcase great examples, bring in ideas and thinking from customer service, hospitality, retail and entertainment and generally, inspire bodies, clubs, enterprises, charities, coaches and others.

6. Network with e-news and sharing of stories and lessons learned

As the project gathers momentum, we propose that we set up the Welcoming Sport Network where we, say, monthly, share ideas and best practices, run webinars, follow-up meetings and generally support the Welcoming Sport movement and momentum to keep the whole ethos growing.

Sports Marketing Network – a strong, credible and experienced partner

Since 2006 SMN have helped physical activity and community sports providers to share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

We have been described as positive disruptors and we have worked with a wide range of sport, physical activity and community organisations helping them to adapt, change and become better equipped to the changing landscape.

More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.

Thousands of people involved with community sport and physical activity across the UK and Scandinavia have participated in one of our ‘hot topics’ conferences covering issues such as Innovation and Enterprise in Community Sport, More Disabled People into Sport, Delivering great sport and physical activities for and with ethnically diverse communities, More Girls into Sport, Britain’s Active Parks, Disability Sport or Sport for Disabled People and A Healthier Nation through Sport and Physical Activity.

We have also developed and delivered year-long projects for Cricket Scotland, Rugby Football League, Football Association Wales Trust, Copenhagen City Council, Ulster University, sportscotland, London Sport, Sport Hub Denmark Golf England, Sport Wales and Guy’s & St Thomas’ Charity/Burgess Sport so we have considerable experience in developing and delivering, sometimes complex, blended, innovative award-winning projects which make a real difference.

How to intensify and speed up the change and innovation process at your community sports organisation

Hits: 79

How to intensify and speed up the change and innovation process at
your community sports organisation

Clue: Don’t expect things to go back to the way they were pre-pandemic

#BetterFairerNormalSport

In the UK and certain other places of Europe, we are now seeing a gradual easing of the corona lockdown measures with organised outdoor sport being allowed in most places and gradually, indoor sport and physical activity opening up.  So far, so good…
 
Many managers and volunteers are working hard to make sure their facilities comply with the regulations for sanitation and safe distancing, which can be demanding enough. But, how prepared are you for the way that people’s habits may have changed and what impact that could have on whether they are returning to your place/centre?
 
Many people have been running with their dogs, walking with neighbours, cycling for the first time, playing family football in the back garden or doing online fitness classes via Zoom, Peleton or Youtube.  How are you going to get those people to (re)join your club/centre?
 
Can a football club run a family football festival? Could a leisure centre organise social cycling starting and finishing at your car park? Could a rugby club organise a charity dog walk in aid of a doggy charity using your clubhouse as a base? Could canoeing, swimming and cycling organisations, say, learn from Parkrun and set up casual social sessions? 
 
The answer is, of course, you could! But we have to accept that there is a battle between the drive/need to step up change and the ‘way we do things around here’ brigade.
 
As we highlight below there are some key drivers for stepping up change and similarly some key barriers for change:

The battle between change and complacency

So, in short, the more the people who want to step up change have to battle with the barriers to change the more resources are wasted and the less likely the change makers are to succeed.
 
Get a really strong coalition behind the drive for change, and if you can, ignore the Negaholics, and most importantly don’t try and change them, because you can’t.  No one can.

Create lasting change working with the willing.
  1. Establish a vision and benchmarks

Where are you now? Where do you want to be? How much time do you anticipate it will take you to actualize your desired outcomes?

  1. Communicate

Keep in mind that it’s simply not possible to communicate too much. Each and every employee will be affected by the hospital culture change somehow. Be creative in your communication strategies, and know that if you want buy-in from direct care providers, they must understand “what’s in it for me.”

  1. Be transparent

Transparency is tough for organizations. It means owning up to what you’re currently doing. Sometimes that’s great and you’re simply trying to move to greater than great, but often it reveals that you have gaps; that you could be doing much better at some things.

  1. Reward positive behavior and successes — even the small ones!

People need to know when they’re doing a good job. As you achieve benchmarks — even small steps toward your ultimate goal — celebrate them. 

Set up a fast-moving innovation project group
 
Ask them to learn, copy, steal and/or adapt other people’s great ideas, both from within and outside sport and physical activity. Bring together different worlds, such as music and walks, dance and football (no, I am not joking: Broughton Park FC in North Wales organised football floss for 50 your females, and some boys) and wild swimming and dogs.

 

Focus on Innovation

Focus on innovation

Eight steps to successful change

  • Increase urgency – inspire people to move, make objectives real and relevant.
  • Build the guiding team – get the right people in place with the right emotional commitment, and the right mix of skills and levels.
  • Get the vision right – get the team to establish a simple vision and strategy, focus on emotional and creative aspects necessary to drive service and efficiency.
  • Communicate for buy-in – Involve as many people as possible, communicate the essentials, simply, and to appeal and respond to people’s needs. De-clutter communications – make technology work for you rather than against.
  • Empower action – Remove obstacles, enable constructive feedback and lots of support from leaders – reward and recognise progress and achievements.
  • Create short-term wins – Set aims that are easy to achieve – in bite-size chunks. Manageable numbers of initiatives. Finish current stages before starting new ones.
  • Don’t let up – Foster and encourage determination and persistence – ongoing change – encourage ongoing progress reporting – highlight achieved and future milestones.
  • Make change stick – Reinforce the value of successful change via recruitment, promotion, new change leaders. Weave change into culture.

If you want to have a chat about change at your place get in touch.
svend@smnuk.com

Community Connectors Programme

Hits: 76

How community sport and physical activity can play
a bigger role in social prescribing
 

Support, training and mentoring programme for community sports providers such as clubs, social enterprises and community coaches

A healthier, happier life
Physical, mental and social wellbeing
Innovative training to get more people active: redefining the workforce

Communty Connectors programme

Social prescribing is happening…

Social prescribing is designed to support people with a wide range of social, emotional or practical needs, and many schemes are focused on improving mental health and physical wellbeing. Those who could benefit from social prescribing schemes include people with mild or long-term mental health problems, people with complex needs, people who are socially isolated and those with multiple long-term conditions who frequently attend either primary or secondary health care. 

These groups have traditionally been less likely to be involved and engaged with community sports providers.

Community Connectors Webinar 1, 12th May 2021, 2 pm BST ws
Community Connectors Webinar 2, 19th May 2021, 2 pm BST ws
Community Connectors Webinar 3, 26th May 2021, 2 pm BST ws

Social prescribing can help deal with three types of health and wellness

Schemes delivering social prescribing can involve a range of activities that are typically provided by voluntary and community sector organisations. Examples include volunteering, arts activities, group learning, gardening, befriending, cookery, healthy eating advice and a range of sports.  

In the UK there are currently around 1300 link workers, based either at GP surgeries or community centres. That number is going to grow to 4500 who all will be keen to link up with providers of community sport and physical activity

How Community Connectors can help engage with your community and the people who need support to improve their physical, mental and social health.  A new workforce equipped to listen, have empathy, help people get started and motivate them to stay involved.

Social prescribing…a big opportunity for community sports providers to play a stronger role in their communities.

 

 

 

“No man is an island”

John Donne 1624

 

The Community Connectors programme will cover many areas:

  • How to use physical fitness sessions as a tool to improve your participants’ general health and well-being
  • Welcoming anyone who is living in homeless hostels, temporary accommodation, bed and breakfast or vulnerably housed
  • Reducing social isolation, improve mental health as well as addressing long-term physical health needs
  • How to listen to people’s lives
  • How to deliver programmes that offer a variety of sessions that are around peer support, group work, diet nutrition, confidence building and raising self-esteem
  • How to keep the participant focused on the positive side of life while getting fitter, healthier and stronger both mentally and physically
  • Helping all participants learn to work as part of a team in a supportive environment that aims to raise their aspiration
  • How community organisations, public sector bodies and providers of sport and physical activity can collaborate and create synergy and co-creation
  • Gathering evidence – how to align with outcomes and report against these effectively, providing guidance and tools for different settings, how to measure outcomes and not just outputs
  • How to use social media to engage and follow up
  • Providing a great customer experience that everyone appreciates
  • Helping participants to be accepted by their peers
  • Running easy and unpressured sessions
  • To connect participants to groups that they maybe didn’t realise there were there
  • How to demonstrate your assets and capabilities
  • Work in partnership with non-sports providers
  • Increase confidence from link workers and social prescribers to refer clients to your U
  • Demonstrate the power of relationship-building and partnership working
  • Shared purpose and ownership

Use social media between sessions to keep participants engaged and motivated

We will also demonstrate

  • How to use social media between sessions to keep participants engaged and motivated
  • Develop a caring and supportive environment that allows participants to have fun and feel social belonging
  • Produce a welcome pack
  • Run taster sessions
  • Upskill your workforce such as coaches and instructors
  • Produce fun and information video
  • Encourage belonging

The programme will also cover how you can engage with new people

  • After treatment
  • On discharge
  • Engaging with link workers and social prescribers either referred or via self-referral)
  • Patient associations/community groups
  • Providing structured and supported self-improvement
  • At day centres and care homes

Outcomes: Upskilling a workforce from outside the traditional sport and physical activity sector
to engage with inactive people

We work on the notion that to stimulate sports and community bodies and providers to change we must introduce new thoughts, tools and to-dos:

First, we must provide people with thoughts and inspiration on how they can make a real difference and become more innovative and efficient.  We have found that story-telling is a fantastic way of doing that.  With our unparalleled track record in working with community sports providers, we have experience from almost all settings that we can share. 

We have found face-to-face encounters are, by far, the best way of sharing best practice
examples.

Then, when we have inspired people we can give them the tools to help them to start making the required changes.  Those tools can be given via webinars, guides and e-newsletters and we are aware that those tools have to be relevant to the specific situation and organisation.

Intro

  • Three one-hour webinars
  • A 24-page Guide
  • Membership of Network with e-news and sharing of stories and lessons learned

Standard

  •  Introductory half-day workshop
  • A 24-page Guide
  • One 30-minute webinar
  • Membership of Network with e-news and sharing of stories and lessons learned £950

All-in-One

  •  Introductory half-day workshop
  • Two follow-up half-day workshops
  • A 24-page Guide
  • Three 30-minute webinars, supporting each of the workshops
  • Membership of Network with e-news and sharing of stories and lessons learned £2350

We have had considerable success in developing and delivering this type of blended learning and information programmes, as we make sure the guidance is supported by practical case-studies. We are of course open to discussing your specific needs to ensure it aligns with your purpose. 

Everyone is time-poor so the Community Connectors programme will focus on providing engaging and relevant learning in bite-size chunks,  available for people at their convenience.

It’s walking…but not as we know it…

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It’s walking…but not as we know it…

In many countries people’s activity habits have changed significantly during the lockdowns towards more informal and, often creative, ways.  One of those growing activities has been wild swimming which is growing all across the UK.

Wild swimming has been very popular with the swimming pools closed in the UK

 

We have also seen cycling expanding during the lockdowns when the roads have been, from family cycling to cycling with your dog!  As we demonstrate below you can cycle in many ways and I am sure that we will be seeing more of these innovations and developments continuing when the lockdown in the UK is being eased further.

It’s cycling, but not as we know it…

But, one simple way of exercising we believe that will be core to our lives will be walking and we have indeed seen walking being as much a social occasion as a physical activity as we can tell from the research from Sport Wales where 45% walked with other adults.

Wild swimming has been very popular with the swimming pools closed in the UK

 We have also seen cycling expanding during the lockdowns when the roads have been, from family cycling to cycling with your dog!  As we demonstrate below you can cycle in many ways and I am sure that we will be seeing more of these innovations and developments continuing when the lockdown in the UK is being eased further.

So here is a video where I highlight several great initiatives where community groups and event organisers are using people’s habits such as walking with their dogs or indeed while they are knitting or indeed walk with hawks:

Watch the video – click here

We also highlight initiatives where people are doing good while they are getting fit such as litter picking:

 

  

The magic of walking with the hawks

Doing good while you are fit

We are also highlighting cases where walkers raise £££ though walks, such as Midnight Walks and Doggy Walks:

Raising money while you are getting fit

So, there you have it, there are indeed many ways you can get people to enjoy going for their walks. Off you go!

How to deliver enterprising community sport in the new ‘normal’ world – how to kickstart Webinar

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Deliver enterprising community sport in the new ‘normal’ world 

How to deliver enterprising community sport in
 the new ‘normal’ world – how to kickstart

An engaging and informative webinar
  Tuesday 24th November 2020 10 am GMT

Project Kickstart – a webinar presenting a ground breaking concept and toolbox designed to help community sports bodies and providers to get up to speed as soon as possible after the coronavirus pandemic