A new workforce for a more active and healthy Britain

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A new workforce for a more active and healthy Britain

Developing and training our community sports and physical activity workforce

Are we focusing on the right areas, skills and methods
or should we be more innovative or flexible?

In partnership with  

A one-day conference, 17th February 2022,
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry

Presentations from

The changing times in community sport…how should our skills agencies, training providers,

sports bodies, FE/HE and others, adapt?

There seem to be many discussions within community sport and physical activity as to how we should develop and deliver workforce training across the sector in the ‘new normal’ world, particularly when it comes to dealing with the many volunteers within the sector.

The questions are also whether too much of our accredited training is too complex and rigid in its structure and if that makes it difficult to adapt content and format to a changing world?

At the same time, how do we ensure that our training and workforce development is recognised and trusted across and beyond the sector?

It has been suggested that we should an element of accredited training covering topics such as life-saving and child protection where specific skills and understanding are key. These standards can include academic quality, ethics, integrity, learning experience, and student experience, among others.

But around areas such as leadership, customer service and communication there could be scope for a more open approach as one can not always put these aspects into boxes. Obviously, the need for delivering quality training in this field is equally as important but could perhaps be measured more around user and participant response.

We are also experiencing interest from some sports bodies to swift attention in sports volunteer workforce development from a rigid, technical focus to a stronger focus on developing a more welcoming and holistic approach to engage and activate inactive people.

Increasing diversity and inclusivity amongst the sporting workforce

Despite continued efforts, and various initiatives, community sport and physical activity in most places has not managed to significantly increase participation among people with different attributes and backgrounds (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion) in a meaningful way.

Also, we continue to see those groups lag behind their white counterparts in terms of being physically active and living long and healthy lives.

So, we must develop training programmes that bring in people from more diverse backgrounds if we are to reach many inactive people. 

This conference will bringing everybody together

We will bring everybody together involved with developing and delivering training and workforce development across community sport and physical activity to discuss, learn, exchange, network and improve and innovate – this conference will do exactly that.

The conference will bring together representatives from the Sports councils in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland accredited and non-accredited training providers, accreditation agencies, national governing bodies of sports, universities, colleges, employers.

Programme and presenters include

Introduction
Chris Johnson, Chair, North of England Activities and Training

Adapting and changing our approach to make it easier for people from all areas of society to enter and move through our sector
Spencer Moore. Director of Strategy at CIMSPA
Steve Mitchell,

Engagement, Environment & Relationship: Understanding People
Justyn Price, Head of Coach Development & Insight, The FA

Creating an agile, flexible, and resilient workforce
Eleanor Ower, People Development Lead, Sport Wales

Developing the workforce who can engage ethnic minorities in the outdoors
Mohammed Dhalech, Outdoor diversity campaigner

Empower unique individuals and professionalise the industry workforce.
Stacey Doherty, Director, Transcend

How to identify and support the workforce required to get people active
Ian Carey, Director, Joanne Dodd, Partnership Officer, Active Black Country

How to develop the workforce required to manage and lead a flagship programme ‘Active Row’ reaching over 3,000 young people
Matt Rostron, CEO, Emily Coe, Director of Programmes, London Youth Rowing

To book your place

click here 

Community Sport in the Future Conference 1st March 2022

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Community Sport in the Future Conference 1st March 2022, CBS Arena. Covemtry

A one-day conference highlighting the challenges and opportunities facing community sport and physical activity

 New habits, digital technology and disengaged groups…how do we embrace?

The Coronavirus (Covid-19) has had a significant impact on life as we know it, and community sport and physical activity are no exemption.

Community sports need to adopt a new mindset and learn a new skill set – taking the best from successful social enterprises and the hospitality sector.  They have to recognise that sport operates in the experience business and that it is competing for people’s leisure time and money and has to attract people away from online shopping, watching Love Island, apathy, etc. by providing better experiences for each customer segment.

Life is changing and community sport has to change with it.. Or even better – if you listen to people and their lives you should be able to anticipate the changes in their needs and wants. You can then adapt your offering and service so you are always that half a step ahead. 

These changes include that many of us have been more active outdoors and in more informal settings and that the number of apps and other digital technology solutions have boomed.  Unfortunately, we are also witnessing a widening in health inequality where the inactive and disengaged groups have become even less active and and

So, what can our sports bodies and clubs and gyms and leisure centres learn from these developments?

The first step is to acknowledge that these trends are accelerating and that they are here to stay. No, we will not go back to “the way things were”, with changing work patterns, massively increased use of technology, growth of social exercise/small sports happening all over the place.

We are also seeing a resurgence in the whole thinking around that sport and physical providers must become better at ”listening to people’s lives” and provide services and experiences that are relevant to different types of people.  High-pressure spinning classes may be great for 25-year old fitness fanatics whereas ‘walking and knitting or singing’ is more likely to appeal to 60+ females.
The second step is to throw away the rule book.  Too many places/clubs/bodies are run by the ‘diehards’ who want things to stay the same, partly because they are afraid of change.
Why can’t our football providers organise family football festivals? Our supermarkets should organise doggy walks starting and finishing in their car parks. Our housing associations could set up sports equipment libraries for residents (this is happening in Roskilde, Denmark)…the list of options is endless.

Build back better

It’s time for a rethink and re-set for providers of community sport and physical activity
In many countries, the traditional leisure facilities are therefore facing considerable financial pressure, whilst workout-at-home brands like Peloton, Nautilus and NordicTrack are reporting massive increases in the number of subscribers, cycling is becoming increasingly popular (In the UK there is a shortage of bikes) and Amazon and Google are joining Apple and many others in launching fitness apps and videos.
We are also an increase in the number of people joining traditional sports clubs but in more flexible ways.  In Denmark, they are seeing many families joining clubs but as part of a ‘motionsfællesskab’, or ‘exercise community’ which has proved popular with females who won’t/can’t commit to regular classes.  We are also experiencing golf clubs where people don’t have to join as members but simply buy say, 100 points, where a round on Saturday costs, say, 10 points whereas a round on a Monday afternoon only costs 4 points. 
We are also experiencing a growing number of non-sports bodies, such as housing, patient associations and social enterprises delivering physical activity programmes to residents, patients and clients, respectively. Many of our sports and leisure centres could benefit from
Does the average community sports club really welcome overweight people with underlying health conditions?  Does the fitness enthusiast want to (re)join their studio/centre when they have now taken out a £50 per month subscription to Peloton?  Can the family which has been used to doing family sport in the back garden join your place as a family? Family football or cricket, anyone?

Who should attend this event?

Representatives from governing bodies of sports, Active Partnerships, leisure trusts, gym operators, local authorities, community sports clubs, sports social enterprises, Sport for Development organisations, sports councils, patient associations and other bodies interested in the future for community sport and physical activity.

The conference will feature these presentations and presenters

Community sport in the future

Rosie Benson, Head of Clubs, Sport England

If you don’t like change, you will really hate irrelevance

Svend Elkjaer, Founder/Director, Sports Marketing Network

Leisure trust of the future

Kirsty Cumming, CEO, Community Leisure

National Governing Bodyof the Future


James Hope-Gill, CEO, Skateboard GB

How a hybrid approach can help engage with local communities for our clubs


Melissa Anderson, Managing Director, Valleys Gymnastics Academy

How inclusive and diverse community sport could look in the future


Michelle Carney, CEO, Purpose Driven Impact

How technology is impacting community sport and what does it look like for the future? 

Francisco Baptista, CEO and Founder, TeamSportz 

teamsportz

Sport for Development in the future


Ollie Dudfield, CEO, Sport for Development Coalition

The role of community sports enterprises in the future


Sensei Mumtaz Khan, Managing Director, Onna Ju-Jitsu Club, Onna Bike, and Bradford Archery Club

Developing and training our community sports and physical activity workforce

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Developing and training our community sports and physical activity workforce

Are we focusing on the right areas, skills and methods
or 
should we be more innovative or flexible?

A one-day conference, 17th February 2022,
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry

The changing times in community sport…how should our skills agencies, training providers, sports bodies, FE/HE and others, adapt?

There seem to be many discussions within community sport and physical activity as to how we should develop and deliver workforce training across the sector in the ‘new normal’ world, particularly when it comes to dealing with the many volunteers within the sector.

The questions are also whether too much of our accredited training is too complex and rigid in its structure and if that makes it difficult to adapt content and format to a changing world?

At the same time, how do we ensure that our training and workforce development is recognised and trusted across and beyond the sector? 

It has been suggested that we should an element of accredited training covering topics such as life-saving and child protection where specific skills and understanding are key. These standards can include academic quality, ethics, integrity, learning experience, and student experience, among others.

But around areas such as leadership, customer service and communication there could be scope for a more open approach as one can not always put these aspects into boxes. Obviously, the need for delivering quality training in this field is equally as important but could perhaps be measured more around user and participant response.

Many people in the sporting workforce do not like to work with inactive people

A recent survey of the sporting workforce showed only 2 in 5 had any sense that working with inactive people was for them

The expertise of the existing sporting workforce is undoubtedly extensive, however, a focus on technical skills has held centre stage for too long. Whilst these have a place and education programmes within these areas will continue, we cannot expect the number of people being active to rise solely based on improving technical capability.

 

We are also experiencing interest from some sports bodies to swift attention in sports volunteer workforce development from a rigid, technical focus to a stronger focus on developing a more welcoming and holistic approach to engage and activate inactive people.

Increasing diversity and inclusivity amongst the sporting workforce

Despite continued efforts, and various initiatives, community sport and physical activity in most places has not managed to significantly increase participation among people with different attributes and backgrounds (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion) in a meaningful way.

Also, we continue to see those groups lag behind their white counterparts in terms of being physically active and living long and healthy lives.

So, we must develop training programmes that bring in people from more diverse backgrounds if we are to reach many inactive people.

One successful programme is the ECB’s South Asian Action Plan which now has attracted 1000 South Asian females who as the new volunteer ‘activators’ will combine coaching and mentoring to inspire and support the next generation of cricketers.

They will support the delivery of All Star Cricket, ECB’s entry-level cricket programme for five to eight-year-olds, in seven cities and act as role models, showing young people the positive part that cricket can play in their lives.

Another key part of developing a workforce that can work with social prescribers and others, to engage with inactive people is to include a focus on people’s mental health in our training programmes, again, something that is not currently being done.

That, again, will require new thinking, new formats and new content.

The sporting landscape has changed enormously in recent years. Government and community expectations for good governance, integrity, equality, member protection and child safeguarding means that providing safe, fair and inclusive sporting environments is no longer an aspiration, but an imperative.

Another point is whether the ‘system’ makes it difficult for smaller providers to access funding and/or get their courses accredited? Many groups, especially diverse ones, feel more comfortable with local, smaller training providers.

Bringing everybody together

We should bring everybody together involved with developing and delivering training and workforce development across community sport and physical activity to discuss, learn, exchange, network and improve and innovate – this conference will do exactly that.

The conference will bring together representatives from the Sports councils in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland accredited and non-accredited training providers, accreditation agencies, national governing bodies of sports, universities, colleges, employers.

The conference will have presentations from representatives from
 

  • Providers of accredited and non-accredited training
  • Workforce/Coach development managers
  • Professional development bodies
  • Standard-setting bodies
  • Accreditation awarding bodies

Project Kickstart Cymru Getting started in the ‘new normal’ world 

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Getting Wales moving, involved in sport and physically active in the ‘new normal’ world

An initiative designed to inspire and support the community sport and physical activity sector in Wales to modernise, become more digital, collaborate amongst themselves and with the non-sports partners and play a bigger role in the community they serve post the pandemic

Webinars
11th March, 15th April, 13th May, 17th June 2021

Conference 13th July 2021 

In Partnership with:

The coronavirus crisis has presented us with challenges and changes to all aspects of our lives and the way that our community sports bodies and providers operate and will be operating in the future.

A key question is how the new ‘normal’ going to look like and how do we respond.

Will the way that we enjoy sport and physical activity be changing and, if so, how can we adapt to that?  We are already experiencing many changes in people’s behaviour in the way we exercise (or not) and we are also seeing many great examples of community spirit, some of them, but perhaps not enough, coming from community sport.

Many community sport and activity providers are in danger of not playing a big enough role in people’s lives right now and are not at the front of people’s minds.  When all this is over and people’s habits have changed those who were visible during the crisis will have a much bigger chance of regaining, or even improving, their reputation and standing in their communities. 

And how ready are you to adapt and change your offering, service and way of delivery?  Do we listen and learn?

There is now a strong need to reimagine and reinvent to focus on new thinking and innovation within community sport and physical activity. But the question is who and how this innovation should be developed and delivered. Do we expect our existing providers and bodies to quickly adapt and develop an innovation culture and start thinking ‘young’ and become positive disruptors to themselves?  Or do we expect the emergence of many new innovators who will develop and deliver these exciting initiatives? Where will they come from? How will they be regarded by the incumbents? 
How do we transform our sports facilities into real hubs for their communities that attract more inactive people in a vibrant, visible and viable way? For some that will require a completely new way of thinking going from facility management to facility enterprise.
As well as money, for this fantastic opportunity to be fully realised considerable elements of motivation, inspiration, learning and developing will be required.

 This is why we are proposing:

Project Kickstart Cymru

How to deliver enterprising community sport and facility enterprise in the new ‘normal’ world
Strategies, policies, experiences, real stories and successes to be told,
lessons to be learnt, ideas and experiences to be shared.

 
This programme will be serving::

  • Sports bodies, providers and clubs developing new formats, tools of engagement and communication, community partnerships, income streams and use of digital media  
  • Sports facilities/leisure trusts/local authorities transforming themselves into community hubs which are attractive and welcoming to the whole community and not just active people by becoming #MoreThanSport 
  • Community/non-sport organisations, such as housing, patient associations, park authorities,  the social business and enterprise sector, health boards and outdoor recreation providers who are using their engagement and connection with their communities to activate and engage local residents
  • National organisations/|Higher and Further Education bodies – those that support the activators, the doers and the innovators.  – such as Sport Wales, National Resource Wales, Public Health Wales, Universities, Colleges, Colegau Cymru, Wales Co-operative, Social Business Wales, etc…

The programme will ask questions such as:

  • How do we engage with the many inactive people who are not active through conventional methods and channels? Do we need new partners and providers and what role can the current sports bodies play?
  • How do we engage the local community and promote community leadership and play our part in the fabric of our local communities? How do we develop and deliver an innovative range of sporting and physical activity opportunities, attracting people of all ages and abilities?
  • How do develop an environment that encourages, inspires and supports people to be active?
  • How do we bridge the gap between ‘sport for sport’s sake’ and ‘sport for change’ and ensure that there is a common vision across all parts of the sector in Wales?
  • How do we encourage social and commercial entrepreneurs to step forward and become part of this new movement and help to develop innovative solutions?
  • How do we help the current providers and bodies to become more innovative and enterprising and to start thinking ‘wrong’?
  • What does community sport look like in the future? How can our community sports providers change and adapt to be relevant in a changing world?
  • Sport or physical activity – is there a difference and does it matter?
  • Who is going to get the inactive active?  How do we develop a more welcoming and relevant workforce?
  • How do the health sector view sport and physical activity?  How can the two collaborate to get more Welsh people moving?
  • What is the role of the modern governing body of sport? Just running their sport or being a community partner or something in between?
  • How do we encourage innovation and enterprise to develop new initiatives to get more people active?
  • What does real success look like?

The programme – four monthly webinars and a one-day conference

4 Webinars
The one-hour webinars will feature an overview and introduction from the organisers and then feature one or two presentations and case studies from providers and organisations from across Wales. 

  • Introducing Project Kickstart Cymru Getting started in the ‘new normal’ world 1 pm BST 11th March 2021
  • How to embrace technology and build on people’s new habits 1 pm  BST 15th April 2021
  • Community Engagement – how to become a real community partner and #MoreThanSport 1 pm BST 13th May 2021
  • Developing an innovative and enterprising approach 10 am BSTon 17th June 2021

Conference
13th July 2021

 
This conference will bring together all the providers and bodies with an interest in reimagining and reinventing how Wales can move forward and create a more healthy, active and engaged Wales in the ‘new normal’ world.
 

Fees
 
The first webinar is free to attend.  
The next three webinars all together cost £35 to attend (£30 for members of the Sports Marketing Network.

To attend the actual conference, and the three webinar costs £155.00 (£130 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network)

The organisers

Tom Overton – is a highly experienced sport, physical activity and community development professional and has more than 20 years’ experience working in various roles across the public sector – most recently as a senior leader in Sport Wales as Head of Community Sport and strategic lead for governance and leadership.
 He brings considerable experience of the sport and physical activity landscape across the UK and detailed knowledge and understanding of the public sector and political landscape in a devolved context; particularly the broader impact that sport has in tackling inequalities and delivering wider social outcomes.

He has recently set up a bespoke consultancy, ‘Dysgu’, to support individuals and organisations to be the best they can be. His recent/current clients include sportscotland, Torfaen Leisure Trust, FAWT, Cardiff City – House of Sport, Bridgend County Borough Council and the Active Black Country Sports Partnership. He is also a part-time lecturer at undergraduate and postgraduate level with the University of South Wales & Cardiff Met and a non-exec director with Welsh Athletics and Show Racism the Red Card. It’s all about people!

Sports Marketing Network, run by Svend Elkjaer, is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.

More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.

The Community Sports Volunteering Summit 2021

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The Community Sports Volunteering Summit 2021

Four webinars and a one-day conference on managing, enabling and inspiring the volunteer workforce in community sport in the ‘new normal’

Webinars

17th February, 17th March, 14th April, 19th May 2021
 
Conference
1st July 2021, Technique Stadium Chesterfield

Balancing the need for strong governance and compliance with the requirement to build a volunteer-friendly culture

With community sports reliant on the volunteer workforce, knowing how to effectively recruit, retain and manage volunteers is crucial to organisational and service resilience – particularly in the context of increasing financial, social and regulatory pressures.

So, why do many, if not all, community sports clubs report that they struggle to recruit and retain skilled and passionate volunteers?  And at the same time, it appears that very few clubs do have active programmes for volunteer leadership and management.

We also come across sports bodies who tend to almost over-burden their club volunteers with all sorts of admin, reporting and governance work – could we not be a bit more considerate when it comes to asking clubs and volunteers for stuff!
So, a key question is about how much focus we give to creating and sustaining great volunteer experiences and to help strengthen leadership and develop an open and enterprising culture across community sport.

This programme provides the opportunity for volunteer and workforce managers to spend some quality time on personal development, networking with colleagues and participating in a host of motivating masterclasses and discussions focused on volunteer recruitment, retention, training, support, and management.
Webinars and Conference – all useful, practical stuff

4 one-hour engaging and interactive webinars

Fees

The first webinar is free to attend.

The next three webinars cost £45 to attend (£35 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network (SEN)
To attend the actual conference, and the three webinar costs £155.00 (£130 for members of the Sports Enterprise Network)

Introduction Webinar
Identifying potential volunteers in your community 17th February 10 am BST

Traditionally, many community sports providers have been relying on former players/athletes and parents as their main pool of volunteers and often the focus on who was available for a particular role and not whether the had the skills and attributes to fulfil that role.

At the same time, there is clear evidence that clubs and other community providers who are engaged with the wider community and are #MoreThanAClub are finding it much easier to identify to skilled and passionate volunteers than those who are ‘just sport’.

This webinar will provide participants with thoughts, tools and to-dos on how to become that community hub which can become an attractive place for ‘community connectors’ to engage and volunteers.

We will also go through practical steps on how to map your community partners around you and how to run a Community Launch to present your great work.

3 Webinars 

This programme is a must-attend for anyone working in community sport, and will help you to improve your recruitment processes, grow and develop

your workforce, and maximise the impact of your volunteers.

How to recruit and welcome volunteers 17th March 2021, 10 am BST

We know from our gyms and leisure centres that the first experience and the induction plays a significant role in the newcomers’ perception of the club and the length of their membership. The same thing also applies to volunteering in community sport so we will
We will also be covering the important aspect of clubs and providers being ‘volunteer friendly’ by welcoming new people, encouraging bite-size volunteering, avoiding lengthy meetings, having fun, having great internal communication and training and supporting people.

The webinar will draw on real-life experiences from many community sports providers and give participants ideas and tools to develop some great practice when it comes to recruiting and welcoming volunteers.

Leadership and management of your club and your volunteers 14th April 2021. 10 am BST

Leadership in voluntary-run sports clubs is a complex issue as people are involved with their clubs for lots of different reasons and that therefore to develop one common culture within a club can be difficult. But the difference between good, and not so good, leadership cultures and practices can have a significant impact can on the growth and success, and otherwise, of our community sports clubs.
In different ways these providers, all based in diverse communities adapted to the conditions imposed by lockdown extremely quickly and competently, despite being in unchartered waters.  Also, they did not wait for instructions from ‘above’ but built on their already brilliant relationship with their local communities and then developed new competencies, like running training sessions via Zoom or used their kitchen to cook meals for people who were shielding. 

This webinar will give participants ready-to-use tools and ideas on how to improving the leadership at your club.

Rewarding and thanking your volunteers 19th May 2021, 10 am BST

Volunteer recognition is probably an area where most community sports providers fall down.  ‘Thank yous’ and birthday cards are indeed rare occurrences, especially if you not one of the ‘diehards’. How many governing bodies do have an award for ‘Best leadership at a community sports club’ or an award for ‘Best bite-size volunteer recognition programme’?
If community sport is to attract and retain skilled and passionate we will have to give much more attention to giving them great experiences, social interaction and a sense of belonging (that ‘welcome’ and that club T-shirt can do wonders).

This webinar will go through the many ways that you can recognise volunteers on social media videos to Christmas cards and everything in-between

The webinars and conference will cover topics such as:

  • Creating a more diverse volunteer workforce
  • How to research what volunteers want to gain from the experience and what they can offer to ensure an individual’s skills and personal contribution to an organisation are fully utilised
  • How to simplify the recruitment process for volunteering to act quickly on expressions of interest
  • Developing new skills through digital roles, including online recruitment and digital cataloguing of stock availability
  • Applying new solutions and ideas for supporting outstanding recruitment, retention and management of volunteers
  • Driving diversity and supporting improved approaches to inclusion and outreach
  • updates on how voluntary organisations can enhance professional development for volunteer managers
  • How to understand what motivates volunteers and how to keep them interested in the 2020s
  • How to develop volunteer-friendly environments that fit in with people’s lives workforce manager
  • What are the specific challenges when it comes to recruiting and retaining officials, referees and umpires
  • Improve the communication process between your organisation and volunteers/prospects
  • Not all volunteers are coaches – how to recruit people with leadership, marketing, financial and community experience to our sports clubs
  • How to motivate and inspire volunteers to welcome change and innovation
  • How to deal with volunteer burnout and mental health
  • Improving the internal communication on our community sports clubs to improve motivation and engagement

Who should attend this programme:

Volunteering Managers, Workforce managers, Heads of Participation and anyone who works on a regular basis with volunteers working in governing bodies of sport, sports development departments, Active Partnerships and other organisations involved with community sport.

The organisers

Sports Marketing Network (SMN) is a unique organisation where physical activity and community sports providers can share best practice on how to become vibrant, visible and viable and develop innovative and enterprising enterprises.
We have been described as positive disruptors and we have worked with a wide range of sport, physical activity and community organisations helping them to adapt, change and become better equipped to the changing landscape.
More than 4000 community sports providers from across the have participated in one of our Grow Your Club workshops, benefitted from 1:2:1 consultancy and mentoring, attended one of our conferences, participated in one of our webinars or read one of our Guides, so we have developed an unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and challenges for the enterprise and innovation aspects of community sport and physical activity.
Thousands of people involved with community sport and physical activity across the UK and Scandinavia have participated in one of our ‘hot topics’ conferences covering issues such as Innovation and Enterprise in Community Sport, More Disabled People into Sport, More Girls into Sport, Britain’s Active Parks and A Healthier Nation through Sport and Physical Activity, to name a few…

 

Want to learn more or get involved, then get in touch with Svend Elkjaer on 01423 326 660 or email him on svend@smnuk.com

Connecting, enabling and driving Scotland’s Activity Economy – Conference and Webinar series

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Connecting, enabling and driving Scotland’s Activity Economy

18th November 2020 – 17th February 2021

Online and  Conference at The Barracks Conference Centre, Stirling FK8 1QZ

Connecting, enabling and driving Scotland’s Activity Economy

Presented by:

An innovative collaboration, through a conference with lead-in and follow-up webinars and guides designed to develop a genuine partnership between private businesses, social enterprises, charities and public sector bodies engaged in Scotland’s activity economy.

First webinar on 18th November with the conference at

The Barracks, Stirling on
17th February 2021

Our objective is to facilitate collaboration, debate, learning and connections to shape system-wide and nation-wide solutions.

We also believe that this period is the time and a huge opportunity to encourage change and innovation to help facilitate an exciting future
for the activity economy in Scotland.

What is the Activity Economy?

Today, the £ Billion global activity economy incorporates such as sport, active recreation, health & wellness, and the technology, tourism and media related to those areas.

In Scotland, the through the activity economy thousands of people are powering the economic and social prosperity of the community. Whether it’s the thousands of people attending the Jedburgh or Inverness Half Marathons every year with the subsequent impact on the local economy, the impact on those providing short-term lodging for travellers, cyclists and ramblers or the impact on the local economy of arts, culture or food festivals, or the thousands of spectators at the Melrose Sevens Rugby, these are all interlinked.

Whereas, Silicon Valley is a leader in technology and London in financial services – Scotland possesses the natural resources – the people, environment and enterprise – to be a global leader in the activity economy.

But being a global leader rarely happens by accident.  It happens from planning and a commitment to pursuing that plan. Now, more than ever, does the sector in Scotland need to pull together, innovate and collaborate.

 

The key sectors within the Activity Economy are organised sports, active recreation, active travel, infrastructure, tourism, arts & culture, education and health & wellbeing.

Programme:

Three lead-in webinars

To introduce participants to the Connecting, enabling and driving Scotland’s Activity Economy collaboration they will be invited to participate in three one-hour long webinars which are designed to help them think and act in a new way where they maximise their opportunities for innovation, change and action.

The main objective for these lead-in webinars is to help participants be more open ready for the conference

 1. Listening, learning and collaborating  18th November 2020

This webinar will introduce participants to the concept of the Activity Economy and the objectives for the collaboration.

It will also cover how to be more user-focused demonstrate empathy and finding innovations and solutions that respond to human needs and user feedback.

We will focus on how to step into the user’s shoes and building genuine empathy for your target audience – we call it listening to people’s lives.

The webinar will also cover how to pool a diverse variety of perspectives and ideas; this is what leads to innovation! How to collaborate with others including bodies and people from outside your normal network and sphere – creating shared value and collaboration.

 

2. Raising the profile 16th December 2020

In today’s fast-changing world everybody involved with the Activity Economy must develop a better understanding and skillset of raising their profile, both individually and collectively. 

Individually, developing better use of digital marketing and community engagement are key factors in growing the reach and scope. Collectively, the Activity sector must develop a stronger profile and platform in order to ‘be invited to the table’.

This webinar will provide participants with clear ideas and tools on how their own profile and that of the sector as a whole, through thoughts, tools and to-dos.

 

3. A bias towards action 13th January 2021

This webinar will cover how to turn your best ideas into prototypes, testing them, and making changes based on user feedback. You must be prepared to repeat certain steps in the process as you uncover flaws and shortcomings in the early versions of your proposed solution.

This webinar will introduce participants to the ‘baby-step’ approach where many small steps eventually will help you make ‘that giant step for mankind’.

Most elite academies are quite clear that they focus on developing talent, whereas social walking groups celebrate companionship and fresh air. 

The challenge comes when there is no agreement within a club or group what kind of experiences they want to provide and who they want to serve.  Some coaches may want to win and others want to give people fun. 

It is imperative that work out who want to serve and what kind of experiences you want to provide.

Conference 17th February 2021

 The Barracks Conference Centre, Stirling

This one-day conference will bring together people from a wide range of providers and partners with the active economy.  Delegates will have the opportunity to listen to senior representatives, learn from grassroots entrepreneurs and great case-studies and get inspired to kickstart the activity economy in Scotland.

The conference will try and discuss questions such as:

  • How do we provide great customer experiences and grow the experience economy whilst at the same time meeting the strategic objectives of external partners and funders, whether they are from sport, health, tourism or hospitality?
  • How do we engage with the many partners, providers and bodies involved with the sector?
  • How can we engage and communicate better using digital communication tools?
  • Do we need new partners and providers and what role can the bodies play in that process?
  • How do we engage the local community and promote community leadership and play our part of the fabric of our local communities??
  • How do we help the current providers and bodies to become more innovative and enterprising and to start thinking ‘wrong’?
  • What does the provider within the active economy of the future look like? How can our current providers change and adapt to be relevant in a changing world?
  • How do we develop a more welcoming and relevant workforce?
  • How do we encourage innovation and enterprise to develop new initiatives to get people into the active economy?
  • What does real success look like?

Book your place

SPECIAL rate for members of  SAAF, Sported, Senscot and SEN